Fall 2014 First Year Course Descriptions



Select search options below to limit the course listings. To search for First Year Seminars, select "LNGC - Lang College" in the Subject drop down menu. To search for First Year Writing courses, select "LFYW -First Year Writing Program" in the Subject drop down menu. To review course options for a particular subject, select from the Subject drop down menu.

*BEST BET* indicates that a class has 2 or more available seats

   

Course Key:
First Year Advising Course
First Year Writing Course
First Year Elective
 
  
 
SUBJ CRSE
TITLE
COURSE DESCRIPTION
JMUH 1803 Credits: 3
History of Jazz *BEST BET*
A one-semester overview of jazz development, beginning with its roots in African, European, and American music and continuing to the bands of New Orleans and other American and world influences. The work and stylistic contributions of the great jazz originals, from Buddy Bolden to John Coltrane and beyond, are examined in their cultural and musical context.
JMUH 2810 Credits: 3
Classical Music History *BEST BET*
A one-semester survey of the great tradition of Western classical music before 1900. Students study the formal and aesthetic qualities of selected works and consider them in relation to their historical and social context. Special attention is given to developing an understanding of the relevance of this musical tradition to contemporary improvising musicians.
LANT 2029 Credits: 4
Culture And Conflict
The organized production of violence has dramatically shaped the histories of many societies. Yet, despite its frequency, anthropological theories about what counts as war, why people fight, and how to best understand war's consequences are various and often contradictory. In this course, we will explore the ways in which social theorists have grappled with war as a human phenomenon that shapes and destroys many forms of social life. We will ask what constitutes war across a variety of different historical and cultural contexts, how anthropologists have tried to explain its position and meaning within them, and how the effects of war can be represented and analyzed using ethnographic methods. Course readings and discussions will present the problem of war within a number of different frameworks and scales. This will include cross-cultural analysis of warmaking practices, ethnographic explorations of structural violence such as colonialism and economic inequality, theories about the relationship between technology and war, and contemporary accounts of industrialized war and its human and material consequences. This course satisfies requirements in reading.
LANT 2031 Credits: 4
Urbanizing Asia
The course explores the emergence and processes of urbanization in Asia through ethnographies. The course will examine urban development of specific Asian cities by focusing on urban problems and challenges including poverty, housing, sustainability and civil society as well as the ways in which city-dwellers, developers and organizations are working to address them. World-class cities like Shanghai, Hong Kong, Tokyo, Singapore and Seoul are hubs of global economy that emerging cities around the world are trying to emulate. There are also cities like South Korea's Paju Book city and the Song Do Ubiquitous city, as well as China's Huang Baiyu Eco-city each organized and built from scratch based on a single idea. Lastly, recent events like the 3.11 Tohoku Earthquake and Typhoon Hai Yan have destroyed entire cities raising further questions about how we inhabit and build the urban environment. This course will examine the histories and trajectories of this wide range of cities taking into account the growing importance being placed on urbanization, design, and urban life. This course satisfies requirements in Doing.
LCST 2120 Credits: 3
Introduction to Cultural Studies *BEST BET*
*Intro to Cultural Studies* [Tracks C & M] This course examines the pivotal role of culture in the modern world, including the ideas, values, artifacts, and practices of people in their collective lives. Cultural Studies focuses on the importance of studying the material processes through which culture is constructed. It highlights process over product and rupture over continuity. In particular, it presents culture as a dynamic arena of social struggle and utopian possibility. Students read key thinkers and examine critical frameworks from a historical and a theoretical approach, such as Raymond Williams, Stuart Hall and the Birmingham School; the work on popular culture, identity politics, and postmodernism in America; and the emergence of a 'global cultural studies' in which transnational cultural flows are examined and assessed. Class sessions are set up as dialogic encounters between cultural theory and concrete analysis. [Tracks C & M]
LCST 2122 Credits: 3
Introduction to Screen Studies *BEST BET*
*Introduction to Screen Studies* [Track S] The goal of this course is to deepen your appreciation of the history of cinema and to explore possible ways of thinking about films. By analyzing influential films from the cinematic canon, as well as theoretical approaches that have been brought to bear on that canon, we will explore the complex relationship between the moving image and critical thought. The course will survey/include the main historical periods and movements from film history ? silent cinema, the classical Hollywood film, Italian Neo-realism, the French New Wave, and American Independent Cinema. The course will also cover some of the major film genres, key films from various national cinemas, and select auteurs from the history of cinema. [Track S]
LCST 2129 Credits: 4
"The Girl" as Media
"*""The Girl"" as Media Image* [Tracks M & C] She is everywhere: selling everything from magazines to real estate. The Girl now mediates our relationship to commodities, and even to each other. Feminist theory has argued that these images are not those of ""real women,"" but has had less to say about how ""she"" has become a structural necessity for marketing. This course examines both these aspectsùgender and commodity. It examines popular culture (Beyonce) and theories of gender, but also writers and artists who have dissented from this figure, from Kathy Acker to Beatriz Preciado. It also considers men who have appropriated and channeled her, from Warhol's transgender superstars to Almodovar's Hollywood drag. This course links theories of the commodity, gender, and sexuality and applies them to contemporary everyday experience. [Tracks M & C]"
LCST 2150 Credits: 3
Directing the Camera
*Directing the Camera* [Track S] How a director decides where to place the camera, how to frame the image and who or what will be seen within the frame, the particulars of lighting a scene and whether or not the camera should move will all be explored and practiced in this mid-level directing course. It is a requirement for entry into the Senior Seminar in Directing. We will complete weekly camera exercises, as well as a final project that incorporates all of our semester's learning. [Track S]
LCST 2160 Credits: 3
Introduction to Editing *BEST BET*
This course will lay the foundation for professional digital video editing techniques and is a pre-requisite for advancement to the Senior Seminar in Screen Production.
LCST 2450 Credits: 3
Introduction to Media Studies *BEST BET*
*Introduction to Media Studies* [Track M] This course introduces the student to basic concepts and approaches in the critical analysis of communications media. Drawing on contemporary critiques and historical studies, it seeks to build an understanding of different forms of media, such as photography and cinema, television and video, the internet and hypermedia, in order to assess their role and impact in society. Since media are at once technology, art and entertainment, and business enterprises, they need to be studied from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. The readings for the course reflect this multi-pronged approach and draw attention to the work of key thinkers and theorists in the field. Moreover, the readings build awareness of the international dimensions of media activity, range, and power. [Track M]
LCST 2901 Credits: 3
Contemporary Independent Cinema *BEST BET*
*Contemporary Independent Cinema* [Track S] This course explores contemporary independent cinema through the viewing and analysis of recent films with, in each instance, the director in attendance to answer questions about the film. Each screening will be introduced by the course instructor who will also moderate the Q & A session with the director afterwards. Students are required to write weekly papers on each film screened, including the Q & A itself. [Track S]
LDAN 2004 Credits: 1
Introduction to Contemporary Dance Practices *BEST BET*
This course, open to all students, introduces basic practices and principles of contemporary dance practices. Classes begin with a slow warm-up focused on anatomical landmarks and alignment principles, but then progress to vigorous, rhythmic movement patterns. A primary focus is to help each student find a connection to the floor from which she or he can stretch and move out into space. The course, which utilizes movement practices that are being utilized by some of the field's most progressive choreographers, will give students experience learning choreographed sequences, while also fostering students' ability to self-direct as movers. Prerequisites: None.
LDAN 2017 Credits: 1
West African Dance Practices *BEST BET*
This course, open to all students, consists of an intensive study of the traditional dances of West Africa with an emphasis on rhythm, kinesthetic form, and gestural expression. The course focuses on traditional West African dance and music forms and their role in everyday life, as well as the evolution and interpretation of these traditions by contemporary African artists. Selected readings, videos, and discussion will complement the physical exploration of the dance forms. Prerequisites: None
LDAN 2027 Credits: 1 TO 2
Moving with Somatics *BEST BET*
This is a movement practice course that is grounded in the perspective of a specific somatic technique -- such as Alexander Technique, Klein Technique, Body-Mind Centering, Feldenkrais Technique, or Laban/Bartenieff Movement Studies -- employing concrete anatomical information as a springboard for fully realized, full-blown dancing. A primary focus is to help each student find a connection to the floor from which she or he can stretch and move out into space. Attention is given to educating the body to move with specificity; to sharpening each student's rhythmic, spatial and energetic acuities; and to augmenting each student's range of qualitative possibilities. The course, which presents movement practices that are being utilized by some of the field's most progressive choreographers, will give students experience learning choreographed sequences, while also fostering students' ability to self-direct as dancers. Prerequisite: a previous Moving with Somatics course or Permission of instructor or dance program coordinator is required. Space is limited and priority is given to dance concentrators.
LDAN 2300 Credits: 1
Introduction to Ballet Practices *BEST BET*
This studio practice course is designed for the student with little to no prior experience with ballet practices, or someone returning to ballet after a hiatus. The course introduces principles of movement, shape, and alignment as grounded in the perspectives of classical ballet practices. Students work at the ballet barre, as well as explore center work that includes adagio, pirouettes, petite allegro and grand allegro. Pre-requisites: None.
LDAN 2502 Credits: 4
Experiential Anatomy
How is it possible for humans to move in the multitude of ways that we do? This studio/seminar course asks the mover to consider and embody anatomical information as a springboard for dancing. Students explore how the body functions through actions and interactions of its structures, while utilizing a possibilities-in-the-field approach to study and embody some of the varied interpretations that can arise from the same set of anatomical facts. Class time will be divided between study of anatomy and kinesthetic information and concepts, and engaging with the material experientially through movement and touch. Required reading and additional research assignments will explore topics related to kinesthetic anatomy and somatic movement approaches. Prerequisites: None.
LDAN 2920 Credits: 4
IHAD Dance Seminar *BEST BET*
The 'DANCE IN EDUCATION: I HAVE A DREAM SEMINAR AND PRACTICUM' will allow Lang students to participate in running an After School Dance Program at the Harlem based 'I Have a Dream' Program at PS 7. In this course students will explore the connection between engaged dance and elementary school literacy, mathematics and social studies. Along with field work at the IHAD program at PS 7 in Harlem, Lang students will participate in a Tuesday seminar where collectively they will engage in an in depth exploration of the field of Dance in Elementary Education. The Tuesday seminar will serve as a tool for reflection about the activities and interactions which take place at the 'I Have a Dream' Program, and allow for planning and shared curriculum development of the After School Dance Program. At the end of the semester, Lang students will help facilitate a performance and/or individual project by the Dreamers for their families and the 'I Have a Dream' community. Lang students will also create a syllabus for use in their own future teaching endeavors, based on an area of interest identified over the course of the semester.
LECO 2002 Credits: 4
The Political Economy of Growth and Distribution *BEST BET*
Economic growth is the defining characteristic of this historical epoch. Attendant to this growth is an unparalleled development of resources. This course critically examines the relationship between the distribution of these resources and economic development. The topics covered will include: the social basis of economic development, neoliberal globalization and uneven development, income inequality, class conflict, and the limits to growth. This course requires students to think abstractly with the use of simple economic models and to be able to critically discuss the topics we cover in a seminar format.
LFYW 1000 Credits: 4
Writing the Essay I: Forbidden Books and Literary Censorship
On what basis are books banned? What assumptions about literature, reading and readers are presupposed by acts of literary censorship? And what is the afterlife of banned books? Why do some slip into oblivion while others develop a cult following? In this writing-intensive course, students explore the history and current practice of literary censorship with an emphasis on modern American literature. In addition to reading banned books by writers such as Walt Whitman, Allen Ginsberg, James Joyce and Kathy Acker, students will read critical articles on the historical, political and legal implications of literary censorship and have an opportunity to develop arguments that engage with questions such as freedom of speech, censorship, silence and the common good.
LFYW 1000 Credits: 4
Writing the Essay I: Giving an Account of Oneself: Identity and Responsibility *BEST BET*
In this writing-intensive course, students examine philosophical and literary works that investigate the difficulties inherent in "giving an account of oneself." The first half of the course examines several classic texts that defined the genre of autobiography and will include brief selections from Augustine's Confessions, Descartes' "Discourse on Method," Rousseau's Confessions, Kant's "What is Enlightenment" and Emerson's "Self-Reliance." In the second half of the course, we will consider a number of texts that have called the value of the autonomous subject into question, including Montaigne's "Of Experience," Emerson's "Experience," excerpts and aphorisms by Nietzsche and essays and selections by Freud, Foucault, Levinas, Derrida, Arendt and Butler. Throughout the course, we will pay particular attention to the genres and rhetorical strategies employed by the authors under consideration, emphasizing how their literary choices both inform and are informed by their understandings of the self, identity, and responsibility.
LFYW 1000 Credits: 4
Writing the Essay I: Issues in Contemporary Culture
This Writing I course offers a broad survey of social, political and cultural topics, ranging from issues of race, gender and violence to esthetics and urbanization—and sometimes the overlap among these. As the semester moves forward, students will have greater choice in pursuing topics of personal (and/or local) interest. The readings vary from personal narratives—by such writers as Brent Staples, Barbara Ehrenreich, and Katha Pollitt—to journalistic pieces to art or film.
LFYW 1000 Credits: 4
Writing the Essay I: Media and the Public Sphere
This writing-intensive course examines the relationship between the media and the public sphere. Students investigate how various forms of media from newspapers to social media, including blogs, vlogs, YouTube, and WikiLeaks, participate in the formation of publics and counter-publics. Specific attention is paid to the role of Twitter and Facebook in both the formation and undoing of contemporary social movements.
LFYW 1000 Credits: 4
Writing the Essay I: Pain and Meaning
Friedrich Nietzsche describes the route by which mankind came to "reason" and moral consciousness: "stoning, breaking on the wheel, piercing with stakes, tearing apart or trampling by horses, boiling of the criminal in oil or wine, flaying alive, and also the practice of smearing the wrongdoer with honey and leaving him in the blazing sun for flies." In this writing-intensive course, we will be examining this relationship between pain, suffering, and affliction, and cultural and linguistic meaning-making. Students will read philosophical texts, critical essays, religious documents, and cultural theory, not only as instances of this topic, but also as displaying a variety of modes of argumentation and rhetoric. Readings will be by Simone Weil, Judith Butler, Friedrich Nietzsche, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Elaine Scarry, Sigmund Freud, Susan Sontag, and Michel Foucault, as well as the Book of Job and its commentaries.
LFYW 1000 Credits: 4
Writing the Essay I: Pain and Meaning *BEST BET*
Friedrich Nietzsche describes the route by which mankind came to "reason" and moral consciousness: "stoning, breaking on the wheel, piercing with stakes, tearing apart or trampling by horses, boiling of the criminal in oil or wine, flaying alive, and also the practice of smearing the wrongdoer with honey and leaving him in the blazing sun for flies." In this writing-intensive course, we will examine the relationship between pain, suffering, and affliction, and cultural and linguistic meaning-making. Students will read philosophical texts, critical essays, religious documents, and cultural theory, not only as instances of this topic, but also as displaying a variety of modes of argumentation and rhetoric. Readings will be by Simone Weil, Judith Butler, Friedrich Nietzsche, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Elaine Scarry, Sigmund Freud, Susan Sontag, and Michel Foucault, as well as the Book of Job and its commentaries.
LFYW 1000 Credits: 4
Writing the Essay I: Reading and Writing the City: Urban Ethnography
Ethnographies are written descriptions of cultural phenomena based on immersive experience. In this writing-intensive course, students explore approaches to observing and writing about the city. Two questions guide this seminar: (1) What distinguishes the ways that cities are imagined and lived from other forms of social organization? and (2) What forms of writing are adequate to the task of critically reflecting on and representing the timing, spacing, and movement of urban life? Students will read and discuss examples of ethnographic writing by sociologists and anthropologists, which may include Claude Lévi-Strauss, Mitchell Duneier, Teresa Caldeira, Philippe Bourgois, Clifford Geertz, Sherry Ortner, Eva Illouz, Setha Low, and João Biehl. We will also consider journalism, cultural criticism, fiction, and film as resources for thinking both about the city and about ethnographic sensibilities. Students' major writing assignments will be based on observations carried out in the city, and the seminar will conclude with a significant research paper that combines empirical research, critical reflection and reasoned analysis.
LFYW 1000 Credits: 4
Writing the Essay I: Rhyming and Stealing
Rhyme and repetition are embedded in the structure of language and serve aesthetic, rhetorical, performative and political functions. Students will respond creatively and critically to a variety of poetical and rhetorical works from ranging from medieval lyric, Shakespeare, Gertrude Stein, Desiderius Erasmus, Harryette Mullen, Jay Z, MC Lyte, various rappers, singers and excerpts from political speeches and advertisements. The course will examine why the repetition of like sounds is a powerful and convincing device capable of selling cars, seducing lovers and rallying support for causes.
LFYW 1000 Credits: 4
Writing the Essay I: The Age of Memoir
In a recent history of autobiography, critic Ben Yagoda claims that 'memoir has become the central form of our culture.' This course considers both the truth and the consequences of this claim, and aims to sharpen students' analytic writing skills by asking them to think and write critically about the role of memoir in American print culture. Students read excerpted memoirs ranging from Olaudah Equiano's eighteenth-century slave narrative to Alison Bechdel's contemporary graphic novel Fun Home, as well as critical essays on memory and memoir by Sigmund Freud, H.G. Wells, Paul Ricoeur, Jean Starobinski, Henry Louis Gates Jr., and Lisa Lowe. Specific attention is paid to debates concerning fabricated memoirs, so-called 'misery memoirs,' and the relationship between memoir and identity formation.
LFYW 1000 Credits: 4
Writing the Essay I: The Future of Feminist Theory
This writing intensive course will look at how several innovative scholars are envisioning the future of feminist theory. Rather than presume to know what feminist theory entails, we will develop a working definition of the field from our engagement with course texts. As a result, no prior knowledge of feminist theory is required, but students will be expected to demonstrate a willingness to listen to challenging texts and new ideas. Class discussions will explore strategies for transforming current inequities into a more just future, and consider how feminist theory can contribute to this kind of radical social change in the world. Students will have an opportunity to use the ideas, concepts, and practices introduced in course to think through a contemporary topic of their choosing.
LFYW 1000 Credits: 4
Writing the Essay I: The Literary Essay
The role of the literary essay in American intellectual life ranges from academic criticism to cultural broadside and makes up one of the most vibrant nonfiction forms in our culture. This workshop-based seminar course will read several short literary works and, for each one, draw on literary essays and criticism from both academic sources and intellectual journals (The New York Review of Books, The Nation, Harper's) to arrive at an in-depth examination of how the literary essay enriches our understanding of literary art. Students will practice literary criticism in three assignments, in the final one of which they will analyze a work of fiction of their choice. The topic of the long essay will also form the basis for an in-class presentation.
LFYW 1000 Credits: 4
Writing the Essay I: The Modern Fairytale
This writing intensive course explores the necessity of storytelling and story making through its most basic and natural histories: the fairytale. What is necessary about the invention of a story and why do we repeat it? How does the story change as it passes across cultures and over time? Most importantly, what does it say about us? In addition to reading fairytales and literary criticism on tales and their circulation, students will investigate the prevalence of fairytales in contemporary literature and popular culture. Texts may include Italio Calvino, Bruno Bettelheim, Washington Irving, Christopher Vogler, Ludmilla Petrushevaskaya, Kelly Link and among others.
LFYW 1000 Credits: 4
Writing the Essay I: The Politics of Emotion
Over the past decade, scholars in fields as diverse as literature, philosophy, psychology, sociology and gender studies have turned their attention to affects or feelings. "Affect theory" does not just seek to describe our feelings but also to investigate how we are affected by the world around us. This class will serve as an introduction to theorists working in affect theory. Key questions include: How do feelings structure contemporary politics? To what extent do feelings of rage, joy or hopelessness both propel and impede social change? And what is the place of feelings in scholarly writing, which often claims to be void of feelings? Is it possible to write without feelings? Among other theorists, this course will include selected readings by Spinoza, Sedgwick, Massumi, Ahmed, and Cvetkovich. We will also explore how creative non-fiction (memoir, personal essay, auto-biographical poetry, etc.) translates into academic work. Ultimately, as we come to write better through both reading and writing, we will also be producing scholarly work that can elicit its own affectual resonances, shaping us in the in-between spaces of text, reader, and classroom.
LFYW 1000 Credits: 4
Writing the Essay I: Too Cool For School
This writing course encourages students to consider the ways they are taught and the unspoken assumptions about their education. To do this effectively, students hone skills for reading, analyzing, and thinking critically about structures of thought implicit in formal education. They think through complicated issues, write to examine that thinking, share their ideas, and make arguments based on their perspectives and understandings. Authors include Paulo Freire, Adrienne Rich, Mary Louise Pratt, and Susan Griffin.
LFYW 1000 Credits: 4
Writing the Essay I: U.S. Politics, Culture and Ideology
This writing intensive course explores the histories, practices, and ideologies of American politics by focusing on U.S. imperialism and colonialism in a global context. With the American Revolution the U.S. became the first "postcolonial empire," simultaneously rejecting imperial oversight and embracing colonial expansion. Yet what does it mean to call the U.S. "imperial," historically or today? How have ideals of liberty and democracy existed in tension with practices of expropriation and race-making ? We will interrogate ideas of freedom, national identity, sovereignty, and property as we trace changing ideas about colonialism and imperialism from 1776 to the present, attending to the ways ideologies of imperialism continue to affect our national discourse. Readings will include classic and contemporary texts from political philosophy, anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, history, and current debates about America's status and role in the world. In addition to active participation in discussions, students will complete a series of short written assignments and a final research paper.
LFYW 1000 Credits: 4
Writing the Essay I: Writing about Values
In this course, students are encouraged to explore the fundamental issues of their lives in order to develop key analytic and argumentative skills. By discussing texts about values, students will consider what is worth striving for and what makes a good or meaningful life. Topics include questions of priorities, definitions of good and evil, questions of cultural and moral relativity, the nature of love, the challenges of suffering and death, and the nature of self-realization. Students will likewise write about social and political issues, including imperialism, minority rights, feminism, food production, and the effect of human "progress" on the environment. Texts may include short works and excerpts by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Plato, Aristotle, Dante, Montaigne, Conrad, Orwell, Achebe, Said, Al Gore, and Michael Pollan, as well as Eastern and Western religious texts and topical newspaper articles.
LHIS 2062 Credits: 4
Sex and the City: The Imagined and Actual Metropolis *BEST BET*
Historically, cities have been assumed to be dangerous places for women. Perhaps nowhere in the United States were these assumptions more intense than in New York City. Why was this the case? To what extent were these concerns based in reality? How were women both empowered by the resources in New York City as well as limited by anxieties about their safety? How was this complicated by assumptions about race and class? To what extent does this belief still exist? This is a multi-disciplinary course, deploying urban studies, women's studies, and American history to help us explore the relationship between the "American metropolis," New York City, and women from the Gilded Age to today. This course will require students to develop and use their analytical skills to grapple with scholarly questions and debates, gain a thorough knowledge of New York City, and become familiar with and adept at analyzing a range of primary sources. At the end of the course, students will have learned how various disciplines approach the question of gender and urban space, reflected critically on the sometimes subtle ways in which gender norms are constructed and reinforced, and evaluated the changing nature of these norms. Furthermore, students will gain historical and theoretical background to help them understand contemporary problems, events, and debates. Students will read about women's experiences in turn-of-the-century amusement parks, early 20th century department stores, and Cold War Queens, among other topics. Literature, including The Great Gatsby, as well as films and television shows, like I Love Lucy, will serve as critical primary sources for us to analyze the relationship between urbanization and urbanity, and gender. Since we are living in the city under study, we will take the opportunity to go on two guided tours of the metropolis as well.
LHIS 2063 Credits: 4
The American Revolution in the Global Imagination
This course focuses on global reactions to the origins, development, and consequences of the American Revolution, c. 1763û1802. Each week, we will center our discussion on how aspects of the American Revolution affected various nations and peoples from across the Atlantic world. We will not only examine reactions in England, Ireland, Scotland, Canada, Haiti, Venezuela, the Caribbean, and France, but will also consider how the American Revolution affected African Americans, Loyalists, Native Americans, and women as well as individuals,. The course begins with an examination of Britain's relationship to its American colonies at the end of the French and Indian War (1756û1763) and then moves on to examine particular events, individuals, areas, and peoples to examine how the course of the American Revolution was understood and perceived throughout the world during the mid- to late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. Themes considered in this course include, but are not restricted to, national identity, liberty, democracy, citizenship, and allegiance. Each week, students will center their discussion around a series of contemporary documents of their choosing. After a brief how-to guide in Week 1, by working in groups, students will be expected to locate their own source materials for each class.
LHIS 2066 Credits: 4
The Fall of the Ancient World and the Emergence of the Medieval *BEST BET*
The fall of the Roman Empire has often been considered the most important event in Western history, setting in motion centuries of decline and decayù the so-called "dark ages." More recently, however, historians have come to see the Middle Ages as the birth of modernity, with new ideas of the individual, a scientific Renaissance, and a universal language (Latin). Furthermore, the fall of Rome and the birth of the middle ages has a resonance with parallel events in China and Central Asia, notably the birth of Islam. We will explore these questions in our class.
LHIS 2221 Credits: 4
Power and Biology: The Global South and the History of Science *BEST BET*
This seminar approaches the history of science from the perspective of the global margins. We will study the contextual connections between biological research, imperialism and postcolonial societies. We will analyze case studies from the history of Eugenics and racism, military research, sexually transmitted diseases and the social and environmental impact of science in the Global South. The course places special emphasis on historical case studies from Latin America and Africa.
LINA 2001 Credits: 4
Ideas & Practices Across the Arts
This course examines ten clusters of ideas, movements and events that have influenced the definition, practice, and experience of the arts. We will consider, among other topics: how considerations of beauty and form shift over time, and across art forms; conceptions of art within social and political theory as illustrated by specific historical events; the contradictory lessons performance teaches about experience, presence, embodiment and authenticity; and, ongoing debates regarding originality and influence, genius and populism, repetition and change, and truth and interpretation. Readings will include philosophical and historical texts as well as artists' statements and manifestos. Our examination of the "ideas" will proceed by placing conceptual propositions in conversation with specific art works, ranging from dance to film to environmental sculpture and CGI environments. *This LINA course can be used to fulfill the Arts program Aesthetics requirement.
LINA 2010 Credits: 2
Arts in NYC
In this course students take part in an exciting variety of music, dance, and theater performances and art exhibits in New York City, including on-campus presentations by visiting artists and scholars. Students attend seven programmed events during the semester and share their reviews in an online forum. Lang College covers the cost of tickets for these events, so course enrollment is limited to Lang students only. The first and only class meeting, required of all registered students, will be held on the second Monday of the semester, Sept. 8, at 6:00pm in the Lang cafe.
LINA 2012 Credits: 3
Hip Hop: Skill, Style, Science
This course explores hip hop aesthetics, techniques, and history by focusing on the music and discourse of those who are engaged in hip hop culture, including (but not limited to) emceeing, deejaying, graffiti writing, and breaking. The focus of the course is on elements of musical style, such as rhythm, form, stress and rhyme patterns, and sampling. Other topics include politics, issues of authenticity, and the connections between hip hop and African diasporic practices. The course offers opportunities for performance and composition. Familiarity with Western music notation is not required.
LINA 2025 Credits: 3
Arts Digital Toolkit *BEST BET*
This course provides students the practical and conceptual skills to integrate digital media into their research presentations and art-making practice. It covers techniques of capture and manipulation of digital media with conventional video cameras and other input tools such as mobile phones, still cameras, and sound recorders and the use of imaging applications from the Adobe Creative Suite such as Premiere, Photoshop and After Effects, as well as selected sound design applications. Students prepare their material for various output scenarios ranging from print graphics to Internet distribution to large-scale projection. Students must own an external hard drive for saving and transferring their work. Owning a digital still or video camera is useful but not mandatory.
LINA 2069 Credits: 4
Shock of the New
This course explores the base cultural conditions of Modernism and the need for new models of expression in the arts to reflect radical changes in modes of living beginning in the late 19th century and through the 20th century. New modes of expression are considered across the arts, from visual art to music and literature to dance and theater performance. The course follows explosive challenges to form and desire for the new in artistic and cultural practice from the growth of the avantûgarde at the turn of the century, through the Punk movements of the `60s and `70's and on to more contemporary reconsiderations of expressive potential.
LINA 2071 Credits: 4
Music in the Museum: Multi-Sensory Art Experiences *BEST BET*
This course explores representations of music and dance in works at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and other local museums. It also considers the role of sound in visually-dominated exhibition spaces. Is a musical instrument in a glass case a musical sculpture? How does musical iconography give us insight into musical traditions for which there are no recordings or notations? How can analysis of ragamala paintings and sculptures of dancing deities inform our understanding of aesthetics in ancient India? Students will conduct two research projects. In one, they will choose a work of art from the museum and research what it can tell us about performing arts. They will choose a second artwork (not an instrument) or gallery within The Metropolitan and propose a way in which the museum could incorporate sound to bring visitors' experiences to life. This course will require frequent trips to museums around the city, with some classes re-scheduled to accommodate these excursions.
LLSJ 2001 Credits: 4
News, Narrative & Design I
This is the first course in a 3-course sequence that focuses on research, reporting and expressing the news. All practice is framed in the historical context of journalism as a crucial part of the Democratic checks-and-balances system. Students gain a grounding in the basic history of the free press and the idea that there are core principles of journalism no matter what the medium or delivery. Students should finish the class knowing what those principles are and able to ask themselves (and answer) with every story: Am I doing journalism?
LLSJ 2237 Credits: 2
News Automata
The recent proliferation of cheap cloud computing and developments in artificial intelligence mean that automation technology is everywhere. What is the role of this technology in news? How can programs assist in the reporting process? This hands-on, making workshop explores different algorithms and approaches being applied to the practice and consumption of journalism, ranging from automatic summarization and fact-checking to crowdsourced reporting systems to articles written entirely by robots. Discussion will include the ethical and practical implications of these technologies, and students will be exposed to current attempts to automate parts of the news process, as well as learn basic computational thinking through small projects week to week. Students will learn from Journalism + Design's developer-in-residence Francis Tseng, a developer and interaction designer at IDEO and recipient of the Knight Foundation's 2014 prototype grant.
LLSJ 2238 Credits: 1 TO 2
Make, Map, Blink: Creating Data-Driven Projects for the Internet and the Physical World *BEST BET*
Learn how to build data-driven maps, charts, bots, detectors and blinkies. John Keefe, from WNYC's Data News Team, will demonstrate one project each evening, most of which have direct journalistic applications. Like a cooking show, he'll walk through how to whip up each one. In some cases, you can make them simultaneously. In all cases, he'll provide the recipes for doing it yourself. Each session is open to all students. To take it as a 1 credit class, you must attend at least half of the sessions. To take it as a two-credit class, you need to attend all 12 weeks. For one credit, 10 weeks. No grades; pass-fail only.
LLSL 2002 Credits: 4
Introduction to Literary Theory & Criticism *BEST BET*
In this course, students will gain an introduction to the major themes and approaches of literary theory across multiple genres, including drama, poetry, the novel, and prose. We will begin with ancient texts, in particular Plato and Aristotle, as they gave us the central terms that continue to orient literary study. We will consider the major themes that developed out of those ancient texts, focusing on issues of representation, appearance, and reality. We will consider several critical works by writers themselves and the difference between criticism and theory. We will draw our contemporary readings from psychoanalysis, feminism, critical race studies, gender and sexuality studies, and post-colonialism. Theorists will include Rousseau, Hegel, Keats, John Ruskin, Freud, Nietzsche, Auerbach, Henry James, Woolf, Pound, Eve Sedgwick, Shoshana Felman, Derrida, Ren? Girard, Homi Bhabha, and Edward Said. Students are expected to have a basic familiarity with literature, and it is advisable to have taken at least one 2000-level course in Literary Studies.
LLSL 2036 Credits: 4
Shakespeare *BEST BET*
The course will consider the greatness of Shakespeare's achievement. We'll read representative plays including the tragedies Macbeth, Othello, and King Lear; the comedies Much Ado about Nothing and The Taming of the Shrew; the history play Richard III; the problem play Measure for Measure. We'll also take up plays that stretch the limits of genre: The Merchant of Venice; Midsummer's Night Dream; The Tempest. Also the close reading of selected sonnets. Two papers; brief critical statements on each play; acting as "director" for a short scene to be played out in class.
LLSL 2052 Credits: 4
American Literature to 1845 *BEST BET*
"This course examines a range of texts and genres of ""early American literature,"" reading authors from the period of the European settlement of the New World through the solidification of a U.S. literary tradition in the mid-19th century. It considers historical, social, and intellectual as well as formal projects of literature, including nation-formation and nationalism, religion and spirituality, race and cross-cultural contact, authority and democracy, utopia and apocalypse. Authors to be considered may include Winthrop, Rowlandson, Crevecoeur, Paine, Franklin, Brockden Brown, Irving, Cooper, Poe, Emerson, and Douglass."
LLSL 2331 Credits: 4
Sex and Sensibility: 18th Century British Fiction *BEST BET*
This course surveys British fiction in the eighteenth century, when the novel flourished as a popular form of literature and attracted critical attention as a dangerously potent genre. We read five crucial novels by Daniel Defoe (Roxana), Samuel Richardson (Pamela), Laurence Sterne (Tristram Shandy), Frances Burney (Evelina), and Maria Edgeworth (Castle Rackrent) as well as satirical narratives (Gulliver's Travels, Shamela, and Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey). We consider why eighteenth-century readers embraced the publication of pseudo-autobiographies, fictive letters, alien adventures, and gothic horror stories - and why critics were appalled.
LLSL 2663 Credits: 4
Anglophone Poetry 1 *BEST BET*
This is the exciting and impressive story of anglophone poetry from about 1540 to 1837, covering the establishment of a strong English tradition in the 16th and 17th centuries through the Augustan period (18th century) and the Romantics. 1837 is the date Victoria ascended the throne. Most of the work we read is English or British but we shall also glance at the origins of anglophone Irish and US poetry. Students are welcome whether or not familiar with poetry and poetics. The course seeks to provide facility in reading and analysing poetry.
LMTH 1950 Credits: 3
Quantitative Reasoning
This course reviews the fundamentals of elementary and intermediate algebra with applications to business and social science. Topics include: using percents, reading and constructing graphs, Venn diagrams, developing quantitative literacy skills, organizing and analyzing data, counting techniques, and elementary probability. Students are also exposed to using technology as graphical and computational aids to solving problems. This course does not satisfy any requirements for the Interdisciplinary Science major.
LMTH 1950 Credits: 3
Quantitative Reasoning *BEST BET*
This course reviews the fundamentals of elementary and intermediate algebra with applications to business and social science. Topics include: using percents, reading and constructing graphs, Venn diagrams, developing quantitative literacy skills, organizing and analyzing data, counting techniques, and elementary probability. Students are also exposed to using technology as graphical and computational aids to solving problems. This course does not satisfy any requirements for the Interdisciplinary Science major.
LMTH 2025 Credits: 4
Statistics for Social Scientists
This course is an introduction to statistics with a focus on applications to the social sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, basic probability, normal distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, correlation and linear regression. The course also provides an introduction to software used to analyze and present statistical information. The emphasis throughout will be on understanding concepts and developing statistical literacy. This course satisfies the requirement for the Sociology major.
LMTH 2030 Credits: 4
Statistics with SPSS
This course is an introduction to statistics using the software package SPSS. Emphasis is on exploring quantitative data and applying concepts to a range of situations. Topics include descriptive statistics, basic probability, normal distributions, correlation, linear regression, and hypothesis tests. The course combines lectures, discussions, and computer assignments. During the semester, students meet at a computer lab to learn specific software skills. Students are expected to go to the lab on a regular basis to complete homework assignments and explore the functionality of SPSS. This course fulfills the second math requirement for the IS major, is a requirement for the ES major, and is taught Fall & Spring.
LMTH 2040 Credits: 3
Calculus
This course is an introduction to the study of differential calculus. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives of algebraic and exponential functions and applications of the derivative to maximization, and related rate problems. The principles of calculus are applied to business and economic problems.
LMTH 2040 Credits: 3
Calculus *BEST BET*
This course is an introduction to the study of differential calculus. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives of algebraic and exponential functions and applications of the derivative to maximization, and related rate problems. The principles of calculus are applied to business and economic problems.
LMTH 2060 Credits: 4
Ethnomathematics *BEST BET*
Ethnomathematics is a new field that combines ideas from mathematics, anthropology, history and education. In this course, we will explore a series of case studies looking at how different people and cultures use mathematical lenses to think about numbers, time, space, relationships, design, and the way the world works. We will discuss how these ideas can be understood in terms of modern concepts in group theory and graph theory, fundamental areas of mathematics that are easily accessible and widely applicable. And we will see how Ethnomathematics challenges the traditional narrative of the history of Western mathematics.
LMUS 2010 Credits: 4
Fundamentals of Western Music *BEST BET*
This course covers the basic concepts and skills of Western music theory and analysis. Topics include acoustics; intervals and ratios; music terminology; melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic structures; standard musical forms; and an introduction to music notation in both treble and bass clefs. The course focuses on common practice tonality, but also explores other possibilities for organizing musical sound. This seminar+ course involves additional activities such as concerts and museum visits outside of regular classtime. This course is one of the two required courses for Contemporary Music majors/minors and a prerequisite for some other music courses such as LMUS 2003: Composition and Analysis.
LMUS 2020 Credits: 2
Lang at Scratch DJ Academy
This course introduces students to the art of DJing with a master DJ at the nearby facilities of Scratch DJ Academy. The focus is on the fundamentals of mixing, scratching, and beat juggling, using turntables and vinyl, in order to develop a solid technical foundation, an inner beat, and a distinct personality that can be applied to changing technology. Students also learn about the history and cultural context of DJing techniques. Class size is limited to 15 students.
LMUS 2024 Credits: 4
Music and Politics
"In 1948, composer and former New School professor Hanns Eisler was deported after an investigation by the House Un-American Activities Committee, led by a young Richard Nixon, decided that he and his music posed a political threat to the United States. Almost a decade earlier, Billy Holiday's ""Strange Fruit"" became what British music critic Leonard Feather would call ""the first significant protest in words and music, the first unmuted cry against racism."" From the Futurists to Bob Dylan to Pink to N.W.A., from classical to jazz to folk, rock and punk, politically engaged music can be found in almost every genre and generation. This course explores forms of political discourse in twentieth-century and current music, focusing on the themes of censorship, rebellion and protest, while also addressing the recent concerns of some composers and critics as to whether politics can and should play a relevant role in musical expression at all. Students are encouraged to explore their own musical backgrounds and interests when completing individual research projects about a specific genre, piece or political movement of their choice."
LMUS 2050 Credits: 4
Music Technology
This introductory course surveys the field of music technology from historical, philosophical, and practical hands-on perspectives. Topics of study include the physics of sound and psychoacoustics; case studies on compositional techniques such as musique concrete and electronic synthesis; studio mixing, recording and production techniques; and digital sampling and editing software.
LMUS 2106 Credits: 4
Underground Dance Music - Electronic Dance Music in NYC
This course surveys electronic dance music in New York with a focus on genres, venues, and participants.
LMUS 2110 Credits: 2
Creative Placemaking in Harlem *BEST BET*
The course explores creative placemaking as an active nexus of music, community, and identity. It focuses on historical and current trends in the social, political, and economic life of Harlem through music, engaging students in site-specific learning opportunities to show how music becomes a means for individuals and institutions to make an impact on their communities. Community partners for this course include Revive Music, the Harlem Arts Festival, and the Employment and Technology Center of Harlem Children's Zone, where Aja Wood leads afterschool workshops focused on identity and community with music from classical through jazz and hip hop.
LMUS 2200 Credits: 4
Global Perspectives on Music
This course explores some of the many ways that people perform, experience, enjoy, and discuss music around the world. Case studies of specific culture areas and significant musicians are tied to local ethnography projects, enabling students to take advantage of the stunning diversity of global music traditions practiced in New York City. The course also covers basic elements of music and terminology, so previous musical experience and familiarity with Western music notation are not required.
LNGC 1405 Credits: 4
Beyond The Beats: New York School of Poets
The generation of writers and artists to emerge in the wake of the Beat Generation in New York City is usually referred to as the New York School. The New York school is most often associated with well known and celebrated figures such as poets Frank O'Hara, John Ashbery, Bernadette Mayer, Alice Notley and Tedd Berrigan. But what do these writers have in common beyond sharing the geography of New York City in their formative years? This course will examine the construction of the New York School as a literary category in the mid twentieth century and explore its ongoing impact on contemporary writing in New York. In addition to reading the writings of several New York School poets and listening and viewing visual and acoustic works by some of the artists and musicians with whom they collaborated, students will explore first-hand how some of New York's downtown neighborhoods shaped the work in question. As one of the required assignments, students will have the option of submitting a piece of creative writing.
LNGC 1406 Credits: 4
Complicating Bodies
Disabled, injured, or otherwise non-normative bodies pervade 20th and 21st century literature and film. This course examines a selection of texts that have interesting things to say about what it means to live in a complicated body. We will explore the tendency to use disabled bodies as a form of metaphor, and well as the critique of this tendency. First, we will pay particular attention to the relationship between the representation of injured or disabled bodies and gender and race. Then, we will explore the ways that texts about disability confound our expectations about the differences between literary and visual representations of non-normative bodies. Literary texts may include Flannery O'Connor, A Good Man is Hard to Find, Junot Diaz, Drown, Toni Morrison "Recitatif," Stephen Crane, "The Monster," David Small, Stitches, and Kevin Brockmeier, The Illumination: A Novel. Films may include Dark Victory (1939) directed by Edmund Goulding Safe (1994) directed by Todd Haynes, Freaks (1932) directed by Todd Browning, and Blue (1993) directed by Derek Jarman. Will we also read criticism by Susan Sontag, Leonard Davis, and Elaine Scarry, among others.
LNGC 1406 Credits: 4
Complicating Bodies
Disabled, injured, or otherwise non-normative bodies pervade 20th and 21st century literature and film. This course examines a selection of texts that have interesting things to say about what it means to live in a complicated body. We will explore the tendency to use disabled bodies as a form of metaphor, and well as the critique of this tendency. First, we will pay particular attention to the relationship between the representation of injured or disabled bodies and gender and race. Then, we will explore the ways that texts about disability confound our expectations about the differences between literary and visual representations of non-normative bodies. Literary texts may include Flannery O'Connor, A Good Man is Hard to Find, Junot Diaz, Drown, Toni Morrison "Recitatif," Stephen Crane, "The Monster," David Small, Stitches, and Kevin Brockmeier, The Illumination: A Novel. Films may include Dark Victory (1939) directed by Edmund Goulding Safe (1994) directed by Todd Haynes, Freaks (1932) directed by Todd Browning, and Blue (1993) directed by Derek Jarman. Will we also read criticism by Susan Sontag, Leonard Davis, and Elaine Scarry, among others.
LNGC 1407 Credits: 4
Race, Gender, Cultural Politics: Reading bell hooks
In this course we will follow the critical interventions of bell hooks and her contributions to women-of-color feminism, and will work towards what hooks calls "education as the practice of freedom." We will read selections from hooks' significant body of theory and criticism, and study the cultural texts that she takes up as well as the writing of other scholars and critics who have also responded to these cultural texts. As we look at representational politics through hooks' interdisciplinary prism, students can expect to encounter a wide range of media including film, music videos, news coverage, and literature. This course offers students the opportunity to engage deeply with foundational texts in critical race studies, feminist theory, education studies, and class-based analysis; and, taking our lead from hooks, the class itself will be a site of inquiry and transformational political action.
LNGC 1407 Credits: 4
Race, Gender, Cultural Politics: Reading bell hooks
In this course we will follow the critical interventions of bell hooks and her contributions to women-of-color feminism, and will work towards what hooks calls "education as the practice of freedom." We will read selections from hooks' significant body of theory and criticism, and study the cultural texts that she takes up as well as the writing of other scholars and critics who have also responded to these cultural texts. As we look at representational politics through hooks' interdisciplinary prism, students can expect to encounter a wide range of media including film, music videos, news coverage, and literature. This course offers students the opportunity to engage deeply with foundational texts in critical race studies, feminist theory, education studies, and class-based analysis; and, taking our lead from hooks, the class itself will be a site of inquiry and transformational political action.
LNGC 1408 Credits: 4
Confronting the Animal: Histories of Humans and Non-humans
"This course will investigate the historical concept of the ""human"", by examining how human beings treat and represent nature, animals, and environment. The course will traverse themes ranging from colonialism and slavery to contemporary food systems and digital media to investigate how boundaries are drawn to delineate the human from the non-human, and to ask about the implications of those boundaries on how we treat other living beings...and ourselves."
LNGC 1408 Credits: 4
Confronting the Animal: Histories of Humans and Non-humans
"This course will investigate the historical concept of the ""human"", by examining how human beings treat and represent nature, animals, and environment. The course will traverse themes ranging from colonialism and slavery to contemporary food systems and digital media to investigate how boundaries are drawn to delineate the human from the non-human, and to ask about the implications of those boundaries on how we treat other living beings...and ourselves."
LNGC 1409 Credits: 4
Black American Lives: Douglass, Lorde and Hansberry
This course focuses on narratives. We will examine Frederick Douglass' s use of biblical and classical rhetoric as he defines himself as abolitionist with an individual voice that is not to be erased by the oversimplifications of politics. We will study the structure of Lorde's biography as she artitulates difference and deviation from conventions. Lastly, we will read Hansberry's theater as a symphony of multiple voices and return to the question of individual and collective identity already present in Douglass's experience of American slavery. Students will be ask to write weekly posts and write two larger papers. Those papers will focus on close readings of the works on the syllabus.
LNGC 1410 Credits: 4
Spanish American Narrative: from the Mexican Revolution to Roberto Bolano
This course provides an overview of Spanish American narrative from Mariano Azuela's The Underdogs (1915), the foundational novel of the Mexican revolution, to Roberto Bolano's By Night in Chile (2000), a meditation on the role of literature in an age of political violence and repression. The course also looks at authors, such as Nobel Prize winners Mario Vargas Llosa or Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who responded to the early twentieth century naturalism represented by Azuela by writing narratives that incorporated modernist literary innovations without rejecting local traditions or abandoning the goal of representing Latin American reality. Other authors studied are Julio Cortazar, Jose Maria Arguedas and Maria Luisa Bombal.
LNGC 1413 Credits: 4
Philosophy and Hip Hop: The Art of Realism and Representation
"What, exactly, does it mean to ""keep it real"" and why would anyone think that is something worth doing? This course draws upon the history of philosophical texts about realism and representation as a way of exploring some of the core themes of hip hop music in the 1980s and 1990s. Authors and musicians covered will include Plato, Aristotle, Gombrich, Goodman, Melle Mel, KRS-One, Rakim, and Public Enemy."
LNGC 1413 Credits: 4
Philosophy and Hip Hop: The Art of Realism and Representation
"What, exactly, does it mean to ""keep it real"" and why would anyone think that is something worth doing? This course draws upon the history of philosophical texts about realism and representation as a way of exploring some of the core themes of hip hop music in the 1980s and 1990s. Authors and musicians covered will include Plato, Aristotle, Gombrich, Goodman, Melle Mel, KRS-One, Rakim, and Public Enemy."
LNGC 1414 Credits: 4
Working New York
This course will investigate a wide range of types of work and workplaces in New York City, including low-wage industrial and service work, professional work in finance and business, creative work in the arts, work in the public sector, and paid and unpaid work in the home. We will situate these forms of work in their historical, political, and institutional contexts, exploring the role of unions, government regulation of wages and working conditions, and the local and global economies. The course will explore the relationship of work to social inequalities of class, race/ethnicity, and gender.
LNGC 1415 Credits: 4
Salinger: an Introduction
This is a course designed to introduce freshman-level readers and writers to the skills of critical writing and û because, as Anthony Powell puts it, "reading novels takes almost as much talent as writing them" û the skills of critical reading. In the first half of this class we will read several key works by J.D. Salinger: Nine Stories, Franny and Zooey, and Raise High the Roofbeams Carpenters and Seymour: an Introduction. Avoiding secondary sources, we will use close readings and writing exercises as our sole tools in an effort to come to a personal understanding of this influential writer -- an understanding that will be expressed in the first two of three papers. In the second half of the semester, we will turn to key works of criticism and journalism about Salinger. Having confronted the texts directly, we will ask ourselves which kinds of criticism -- biographical, evaluative, theoretical -- most enriched our understanding of the texts themselves, and why? Our answers will consider all the aspects of the critical essay. How does literary criticism contribute to the experience of literary art -- and how can it detract from that experience? Why does literature, and by extension all art, require explanation and explication by expert readers? And how do we, as readers and writers, use this explication within the essentially personal act of reading? The final project will be a rigorous analytic essay in which each student will practice and exemplify the qualities of literary criticism that have come, over the semester, to be the most meaningful to him or her.
LNGC 1415 Credits: 4
Salinger: an Introduction
This is a course designed to introduce freshman-level readers and writers to the skills of critical writing and û because, as Anthony Powell puts it, "reading novels takes almost as much talent as writing them" û the skills of critical reading. In the first half of this class we will read several key works by J.D. Salinger: Nine Stories, Franny and Zooey, and Raise High the Roofbeams Carpenters and Seymour: an Introduction. Avoiding secondary sources, we will use close readings and writing exercises as our sole tools in an effort to come to a personal understanding of this influential writer -- an understanding that will be expressed in the first two of three papers. In the second half of the semester, we will turn to key works of criticism and journalism about Salinger. Having confronted the texts directly, we will ask ourselves which kinds of criticism -- biographical, evaluative, theoretical -- most enriched our understanding of the texts themselves, and why? Our answers will consider all the aspects of the critical essay. How does literary criticism contribute to the experience of literary art -- and how can it detract from that experience? Why does literature, and by extension all art, require explanation and explication by expert readers? And how do we, as readers and writers, use this explication within the essentially personal act of reading? The final project will be a rigorous analytic essay in which each student will practice and exemplify the qualities of literary criticism that have come, over the semester, to be the most meaningful to him or her.
LNGC 1416 Credits: 4
Spectacular Cities
In the late 1960s Guy Debord began to develop the concept of the 'spectacle' to refer to a new stage in the development of capitalist urbanization: "an image-saturated society where advertising, entertainment, television and mass media increasingly define and shape urban life" while obscuring the alienating effects of capitalist social relations. In recent decades we have witnessed the emergence of dramatically new forms of urban spectacle reflecting the growing significance of symbolic economies û associated with finance, media, tourism, heritage, gentrification and, above all consumerism û in transforming urban landscapes, economies and the lives of urban inhabitants. Taking Debord's work as a departure point, this course will chart the rise of 'spectacular cities' û exploring both cause and consequence through a focus on a variety of sites across the globe.
LNGC 1416 Credits: 4
Spectacular Cities
In the late 1960s Guy Debord began to develop the concept of the 'spectacle' to refer to a new stage in the development of capitalist urbanization: "an image-saturated society where advertising, entertainment, television and mass media increasingly define and shape urban life" while obscuring the alienating effects of capitalist social relations. In recent decades we have witnessed the emergence of dramatically new forms of urban spectacle reflecting the growing significance of symbolic economies û associated with finance, media, tourism, heritage, gentrification and, above all consumerism û in transforming urban landscapes, economies and the lives of urban inhabitants. Taking Debord's work as a departure point, this course will chart the rise of 'spectacular cities' û exploring both cause and consequence through a focus on a variety of sites across the globe.
LNGC 1417 Credits: 4
Politics and the Literature of Social Reflection
In this course, we examine a tradition in social research that lies beyond the usual boundaries of the field of politics yet speaks directly to it. This is the tradition of immersion, which we define as close engagement with human communities of interest to the author, and analysis written from a personal point of view. Most of the authors we read shared in, by force of circumstance or by choice, certain aspects of the conditions about which he or she wrote. Today, we might categorize some such work as participant-observation research or ethnography. For this course, we read work that undertakes to describe and reflect upon the social and political landscape of their authors' day and place. In our discussions, we consider fundamental questions in the study of human society and interrogate the relationship between the observer and the observed: who gets to tell people's story? Wherein lies the right to describe and analyze others' lives, and who decides? Finally, we consider wherein lie the limits of empathy and moral imagination: what is the relationship between authorial experience and understanding of others' experiences
LNGC 1420 Credits: 4
Mad Love: Seminar on Surrealism
"Beloved imagination, what I most like in you is your unsparing quality": This first year seminar offers an introduction to the key tenets of Surrealism. From Andr? Breton's Manifesto of Surrealism (1924), the class works through the significance of Surrealism as an international avant-garde art movement during inter-war period. Focus will be placed on the influence of psychoanalysis and marxism in the Surrealist insistence on the "absolute" reality of dream and reality: sur-reality. Students will work through a variety of Surrealist techniques and games to claim the irrational and the sensual as a refusal of the rationality of normative culture - for instance, automatism, the drift and the chance encounter, the found object, collage and photomontage, the exquisite corpse. Key figures: the poets Andr? Breton (Nadja, Mad Love), Louis Aragon (Peasant of Paris); the playwright Antonin Artaud (The Theatre and Its Double); the philosopher Georges Bataille (The Accursed Share); the artists Luis Bu±uel, Claude Cahun, Salvador Dal?, Giorgio De Chirico, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, M?ret Oppenheim, Man Ray, among others. Students will address the radicality of the Surrealist call for an unsparing, limitless imagination and how it continues to echo decades later in the political slogan: "Be realistic! Demand the impossible!"
LNGC 1420 Credits: 4
Mad Love: Seminar on Surrealism
"Beloved imagination, what I most like in you is your unsparing quality": This first year seminar offers an introduction to the key tenets of Surrealism. From Andr? Breton's Manifesto of Surrealism (1924), the class works through the significance of Surrealism as an international avant-garde art movement during inter-war period. Focus will be placed on the influence of psychoanalysis and marxism in the Surrealist insistence on the "absolute" reality of dream and reality: sur-reality. Students will work through a variety of Surrealist techniques and games to claim the irrational and the sensual as a refusal of the rationality of normative culture - for instance, automatism, the drift and the chance encounter, the found object, collage and photomontage, the exquisite corpse. Key figures: the poets Andr? Breton (Nadja, Mad Love), Louis Aragon (Peasant of Paris); the playwright Antonin Artaud (The Theatre and Its Double); the philosopher Georges Bataille (The Accursed Share); the artists Luis Bu±uel, Claude Cahun, Salvador Dal?, Giorgio De Chirico, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, M?ret Oppenheim, Man Ray, among others. Students will address the radicality of the Surrealist call for an unsparing, limitless imagination and how it continues to echo decades later in the political slogan: "Be realistic! Demand the impossible!"
LNGC 1426 Credits: 4
Childhood and Culture
Children don't speak, think, or behave like adults. In a parallel fashion, the French don't speak, think or behave like the English; the English don't speak, think or behave like North Americans; and so on. This course takes this parallel seriously, exploring the lives of children, the life-spaces they inhabit, and commonly held ideas about children and parenting from a cultural perspective. We will treat childhood both as a cultural construction and as a distinctly constructed culture. We will pose a number of questions, including: How do children acquire knowledge of the cultures they live in and the knowledge needed to participate in these cultures? How important are parents in shaping the development of their children? What implications do different notions of childhood have for the developmental pathways of children? Special emphasis is given to representations of children and childhood in American culture.
LNGC 1473 Credits: 4
NY In a Poet
This advising course, with a focus on reading and writing poetry, is organized around Federico Garc?a Lorca's masterful Poet in New York. This collection is based on the great Spanish poet and playwright's nine-month stay in the city (ostensibly to study English at Columbia University) that began just prior to the October 1929 crash and the start of the Great Depression. Poet in New York differs dramatically from his earlier poetry, which had brought him great fame in Spain. Gone is the bucolic nature imagery, replaced by an (often) horrified, visionary surrealism that reflected both the attraction and the repulsion Lorca felt for the city. Comparable in its literary scope and vision to Dante's Inferno and Eliot's Wasteland, students read the work in its entirety along with companion poems by other poets, many of whom, in celebrating the city, write decidedly different poetry of the city. We will draw on these poems for inspiration to write our own poems, as well as a series of response papers. The course includes a series of excursions to various parts of New York's five boroughs.
First-Years Lang students only
LNGC 1477 Credits: 4
Civil Disob, State & Law
Most of us likely agree that there exists in democratic societies a general obligation to obey the law. Yet we also likely believe that we are not obliged to obey laws which we perceive as grossly unjust. This course explores the tension between these commonly held views by examining the theory and practice of civil disobedience and extra-legal protest in a formal democracy such as the United States. Central questions include: what is the source of the legitimacy of law? How extensive is the obligation to obey the law? How do political dissidents justify acts of extra-legal protest? Does civil disobedience hurt or nourish democracy? How does the state respond to radical dissent, and what happens when the state itself becomes lawless? The course does not seek a comprehensive answer to these questions, but instead aims to develop a sense of how complex, challenging, and urgent they are. We will read and discuss works of political philosophy and legal theory, profile resistance to racism, war, and drug laws, and examine -- in ways both personal and political -- our own relationship to the law and morality.
LNGC 1496 Credits: 4
Biology, Art, & Social Justice
In this course we will explore how artists and scientists are working together to create news ways of knowing and understanding the world we live in. We will explore how science and art are perceptual practices that involve inquiry, creativity, interpretation, and personal expression. We will analyze articles, artist interviews and exhibits, and scientific summaries focused on new biotechnologies and their impact on food, agriculture, and human identity. Discussions will center on discoveries coming out of the Human Genome Project, environmental studies, and cultural studies and ask us to re-examine how we define who we are and how we interact with one another. Our place in the natural and material world is shifting, and artists and scientists are helping us navigate this new terrain and helping us bring awareness around issues of social justice. We will conduct two experiments at the local level: isolating your own DNA and painting with bacteria. At the end of the course we will assess how this course and its approach has affected your perception of learning and the impact it has had on visual literacy.
LNGC 1503 Credits: 4
Understanding the Economy
What is needed to understand economic affairs? Is specialized knowledge important? What role does the connection between politics and economics play? In this course, we will use current economic news to gain greater familiarity with the economic concepts and tools necessary to understand economic debates.
LNGC 1509 Credits: 4
The Essays of David Foster Wallace
"Perhaps better known as a novelist, David Foster Wallace was also a master essayist, whose works offer a unique look at what has animated our culture over the past generation, from hi-brow to lo. Wallace's essays explore matters from animal ethics to the physics of a game of tennis, from David Lynch and John McCain to Roger Federer and Tracy Austin (who broke his heart). He wrote about philosophy and pornography, cruise ships and Dostoevsky. This seminar explores Wallace's non-fiction work in pieces and as a whole, and as an example of what the essay alone may be able to do in our time. We ask also, in the words of one critic: ""How much can we sort of pin on DFW?"""
LNGC 1509 Credits: 4
The Essays of David Foster Wallace
"Perhaps better known as a novelist, David Foster Wallace was also a master essayist, whose works offer a unique look at what has animated our culture over the past generation, from hi-brow to lo. Wallace's essays explore matters from animal ethics to the physics of a game of tennis, from David Lynch and John McCain to Roger Federer and Tracy Austin (who broke his heart). He wrote about philosophy and pornography, cruise ships and Dostoevsky. This seminar explores Wallace's non-fiction work in pieces and as a whole, and as an example of what the essay alone may be able to do in our time. We ask also, in the words of one critic: ""How much can we sort of pin on DFW?"""
LNGC 1515 Credits: 4
The Metro Desk
What better way to learn the city than to venture out of the classroom, into the urban jungle, and write about it? In this seminar, students explore their city environs as they don the guise of young reporters. Working sometimes individually and other times in groups, we learn about and report on various places, events, and cultures around the city. We explore historical, political, and social angles, generating newsworthy stories, as we tackle hot-button issues like gentrification or ethics and accuracy in writing. Students are encouraged to bring a range of interests to class---literary, musical, linguistic---that will broaden our approach to assigned topics. Our readings comprise varied forms of journalism---from long and short form print to blog to photo essays---and in turn, so do the class assignments. Guest speakers may include journalists (newspaper editor, news reporter, photojournalist) and NYC experts, such as an urban planner, who can help deepen our conversations.
LNGC 1517 Credits: 4
The Critical Museum Visitor
At different points in history, museums have functioned as sites of education, social control, propaganda and social resistance. In this course, students explore how museums are implicated in politics, history and culture by becoming critical museum visitors. Among other topics, students will investigate how museum architecture, museum security and external funders impact what we see and experience in museums and how we are permitted to behave in these spaces. In addition to reading key works in the fields of cultural studies and museum studies, students will visit several New York museums, including the new 9/11 Museum, to carry out firsthand observations on how these institutions construct narratives about the past and present and to further consider what is at stake in the stories they seek to tell.
LNGC 1534 Credits: 4
Improvisation:Embodied
This course analyzes how, if at all, we might understand improvised dance as a politically meaningful practice. Where does its power exist? In addition to viewing a range of performances, students survey recent literature on improvised dance. But we'll also look beyond typical configurations of dance. At various points, the course turns to jazz and jazz studies, where one finds a vast and rigorous analysis of improvisation, and often an exacting look at race, gender, and the politics of performance. Students also read critical theory that illuminates important concepts in improvisation such as instinct, spontaneity, constraint, and freedom. A primary goal will be to consider improvisatory practices in art as well as in everyday life. There will be a studio component to the class (we'll have opportunities to explore ideas through movement), but students need not have prior dance training.
LPHI 2008 Credits: 4
Animals, Ethics and Politics
Relationships between humans, non-human animals and the rest of nature raise difficult questions for moral and political thought. These questions, long sidelined by moral philosophers and political theorists alike, are today increasingly recognized as important and urgent. This course offers a tour of this challenging intellectual terrain. The course has two main emphases. The first is examining the representations of animal life in mainstream animal rights theory, as well as in the work of various dissenters, and using this intellectual corpus as a reference point for asking how humans and animals should enter moral thought. The second is investigating how attention to (or neglect of) non-human animals and to nature more generally is reflected in contemporary political theory. In addressing both ethical and political questions, we will refer to significant real world cases. Our goal in doing so will be to bring our theoretical readings to life, assessing them by bringing them to bear on experience. Course materials will be drawn from literary, philosophical and historical works, blogs, newspapers and works of political theory and documentary films.
LPHI 2010 Credits: 4
Philosophy I: Ancient
This required course is an introduction to the major themes and important texts of ancient philosophy, covering such philosophers as Heraclitus, Parmenides, Plato, and Aristotle.
LPHI 2020 Credits: 4
Philosophy II: Modern *BEST BET*
In this course we explore "the modern period" of the history of Western philosophy - a period of continued relevance that brought about a pervasive change in our self- and world-conception. Fueled by the Scientific Revolution (embodied by figures like Galileo, Bacon, Boyle and Descartes), philosophers from 17th and 18th century-Europe fervently rejected old authorities as they developed new answers to fundamental philosophical questions. These questions concerned the structure of reality, the capacities and limits of the human mind, the sources of legitimate knowledge, the shape and possibility of human freedom and the nature of morality. The objective of this course is for students to gain a broad understanding of the manner in which these questions were rethought in this period of radical change through a close reading of Descartes, Spinoza, Hobbes, Rousseau, Hume and Kant.
LPOL 2013 Credits: 4
Famous Trials *BEST BET*
Trials have long been used to determine the "truth." Throughout history, a few trials have not only captured the interest of their contemporary public but have remained embedded in our collective, historical memory. What is it that makes the stories and lessons from these trials remain of interest long after the actual events have passed? Perhaps their lasting importance comes not from the event itself, but from the fact that the trial provided an important view of the condition of the time in which it took place. The trial is memorable because it captures critical events and debates in important moments of change. In this course we will examine some of these famous trials. We will consider the relevant historical, cultural and political context in which the trial took place. Our goal is to understand the trial itself as well as the larger context that made the trial memorable and important. The trials will be used as a lens to examine major historical transitions. Among the trials we will be studying are: the Trial of Socrates, the Trial of Galileo, the Trial of Anne Hutchinson, the Salem Witchcraft Trials, the Lincoln Assassination Conspiracy Trial, the Scopes "Monkey" Trial, the Trials of the "Scottsboro Boys", the Nuremberg Trials, and the Chicago 7 Trial. In addition to traditional sources, we will use documents and transcripts as well as contemporary adaptations, including films and plays, to inform our understanding of these interesting historical events.
LPOL 2035 Credits: 4
Commodities: An Introduction to the Political Economy of Consumer Culture
We live in a world increasingly saturated by market forces, where an ever-growing number of things are up for sale. But what does it mean for something to be a commodity? What logics govern the markets for things as diverse as sugar, art, animals, and DNA? What can we learn about society, history, and politics û and ourselves - by studying products? And should there be limits to what can be bought and sold? This course foregrounds commodities as a base for introducing students to foundational aspects of the theory and practice of political economy. By engaging with a range of primary commodities as they move through various phases of their respective value chains, we will explore the dynamics of production, market exchange, advertising, and consumption. We will then turn to the question of what is obscured by the (fetishized) commodity form and how value (and values) is created in markets. This will include an introduction to the debates about the social and ethical limits of commodification. Throughout, we will interrogate the broader historical and economic context within which market exchange takes place while also examining our individual participation in the system and the range of political opportunities for personal and systemic change. To address these issues, we will draw on an a wide range of authors belonging to diverse disciplines, including Karl Marx, William Cronon, Jean Baudrillard, Viviana Zelizer, and Ralph Nader, among many others.
LPOL 2036 Credits: 4
Interrogating the Concept of Democracy - From Ancient Athens to Occupy Wall Street *BEST BET*
"There are approximately 130 democratic countries in the world. Democracy is the most desired and most accepted political regime by the majority of the global population. In Western capitalist societies formal democratic institutions enjoy the status of a ""common sense"" and are taken by many for granted. Democratic aspirations, demands for equality, human rights, autonomy and social justice are proclaimed by various movements and activist groups in different parts of the world. The major historical political shifts of the last two centuries and emergence of national states are related to the advancement of democracy. However, the question remains salient - what is democracy? This course focuses on the concept and notions of democracy. It introduces students to selected debates in democratic theory and concepts which are situated at the heart of democracy such as freedom, equality, collectivity, autonomy, emancipation, self-rule, law, popular sovereignty and power. We will critically examine various theories and views of democracy from classical thinkers of ancient Greece to contemporary thinkers of radical democracy. The course places attention to critiques of democratic politics and paradoxes and tensions inherent within the democracy itself such as democracy's tyrannical and imperial tendencies, relationship between popular sovereignty and individual rights, self-rule and logic of representation, tensions between liberalism and democracy, deliberation and agonism, elitist versus participatory democracy. We will explore major themes related to debates between ancient and modern models of democracy, tensions between formal, institutional democratic politics and theories of radical democracy and examine if advancing communication technologies of capitalist societies foster or diminish social democratic potential."
LPSY 2008 Credits: 4
Abnormal Psychology *BEST BET*
This course introduces students to the study of abnormal psychology. Students learn the current classification system (DSM IV) for psychiatric disorders and become familiar with theories of etiology and treatment for individual disorders. Historical and contemporary conceptions of abnormal behavior are explored as well as controversies within the field regarding the classification, assessment, and treatment of psychological disorders.
LPSY 2038 Credits: 4
Fundamentals in Visual Percept *BEST BET*
This is a survey course of the research and theories associated with human visual perception.
LPSY 2040 Credits: 4
Fundamentals in Social Psychology *BEST BET*
This course provides students with a broad overview of social psychological research and theorizing. Central to the course is the idea that human beings are not isolated entities who process information like computers, but social animals engaged in a complex network of social relations, driven by goals and motivations and constrained by cultural worldviews. We will analyze how this affects our perceptions of and attitudes towards individuals (including ourselves) and groups. We will examine why people conform, how they influence each other, why they firmly hold on to stereotypes and why they engage in pro- or antisocial behaviors. By analyzing these phenomena we will see how theories of human behavior can be tested rigorously via laboratory experiments and field studies.
LPSY 2042 Credits: 4
Fundamentals of Cognitive Psychology *BEST BET*
This is course is an introduction to the various aspects of human cognition, including the processes assiciated with memory, attention, language processing and perception.
LPSY 2048 Credits: 4
Fundamentals in Cognitive Neuroscience *BEST BET*
This course is an introduction to the basic structural and functional properties of the human nervous system and their relationship to various aspects of human cognition.
LREL 2030 Credits: 4
Religion in South Asia *BEST BET*
This course is a comprehensive introduction to Indian philosophy and religion. It covers all the major philosophical schools, concepts, issues, and debates in a chronological framework. Students read both translations of primary sources as well as materials from secondary sources. This course aims to familiarize students with the kinds of questions asked by Indian thinkers such as: What really exists (metaphysics)? How do we know what we know (epistemology)? And how should we live our lives (ethics)? Students gain exposure to the practice of Indian philosophy and religion through local fieldwork projects.
LREL 2055 Credits: 4
Encountering Rel Pluralism *BEST BET*
"From Rap churches to Sikh policemen, from Buddhist meditation in prisons to Latinos converting to Islam, this course explores contemporary religious pluralism in America, along with the expression of sacred meaning within a context of religious diversity; in particular, what scholars call ""lived religion."" Some of our topics will include: an historical perspective of religious pluralism in America; post-9/11 challenges; religion on the internet; manifestations of, and encounters with, religious diversity and difference; inter/intra religious cooperation and confrontation; and tensions between religious and secular authority. Our modes of inquiry will include fieldwork (e.g., participant/observer study; site visits on your own), critical self-reflection, and a review of current and past news and contemporary scholarly literature."
LREL 2070 Credits: 4
Hebrew Bible as Literature *BEST BET*
The Hebrew Bible is an anthology of literatures, a historical digest, ethical law collection, and a record of one people's experience of their deity. Class readings emphasize literary genres: the myths of Genesis, narratives of slavery and liberation, the Joseph novella, the political epic of Samuel and Kings, the Book of Ruth as a short story, and Esther as an attempted genocide tempered by farce. Students explore the Bible's methods of characterization and elliptical storytelling techniques. Biblical concepts ûmonotheism, human failure and redemption, creationû are grounded by scholarship in ancient near eastern history and also examined from contemporary perspectives: the prophet Jeremiah in light of 9/11 and other familiar destructions; and Mother Eve and biblical daughters through feminist and gender analysis. Special consideration is given to the influence of Women's and Gender Studies on biblical scholarship. All texts are in English.
LREL 2105 Credits: 4
Catholic Saints & Their Cults *BEST BET*
This course examines the literature and art that grew up around the cult of the saints in the Catholic tradition. Students read accounts of the lives and miracles of the saints (hagiographies), paying close attention to the various literary forms they take (memoir, letter, sermon, romance, etc.) and the ways in which history has informed and changed the understanding of the holy and role of the saint. The course also considers the evolving theological arguments for and against the veneration and depiction of the saints in a variety of historical and political contexts.
LREL 2106 Credits: 4
Intro to Phil of Religion
Through analysis of classic formulations, students investigate arguments concerning the existence of God, the divine attributes, and religious experience. Topics include the questions raised to religious commitment by the existence of evil, freedom, and science? The course also explores the nature of faith and religious commitment, and the relation of philosophical argument to them.
LREL 2804 Credits: 4
Ritual and the Body *BEST BET*
This course explores one of the central aspects of religion: ritual. We will consider the role of rituals in structuring the lives of individuals and communities, both as a means of expressing beliefs and values and as a means of training the body to develop certain habits and dispositions. We will also see how rituals shape, and are shaped by, local gender roles û how they perform, perpetuate, and transform what it means to be gendered in a variety of communities. Readings include anthropological, sociological, and philosophical accounts of ritual, and will be supplemented by the concrete examples of ritual introduced by site visits and observations, film, and students' own experiences.
LSCI 2040 Credits: 4
Genes, Environment & Behavior *BEST BET*
This course uses a critical pedagogy to challenge the normative assumptions made about the dynamic relationship between our genetic make up and our environments and explore the field of epigenetics. Course sessions and assignments will retrace the experiments that led to the discovery of genes and their inheritance patterns, review molecular analyses to understand the functional products of genes, and reveal how the acquisition and accumulation of mutations and sex lead to diverse human behaviors that can be influenced by environmental factors in changing social environments. Course readings include newspaper articles, secondary scientific literature, and a textbook, while videos and CD-ROMS depicting molecular DNA techniques and their automation will clarify the more technical aspects of the course. Prerequisite for all biology intermediate level courses, satisfies the Foundation requirement for the Interdisciplinary Science major, satisfies the elective for Psychology, satisfies the elective for the Gender Studies Minor, and is offered every fall.
LSCI 2300 Credits: 4
Introduction to Urban Environmental Health *BEST BET*
In this course, we will look at a broad range of factors affecting public health in urban environments. In 2009, for the first time in human history, more than half of the world's population resides in urban areas. Urban growth has outpaced the ability of governments to build essential infrastructures, and one in three urban dwellers lives in slums or informal settlements. The pace of urbanization results in built and social environments that place stress on human immune systems, increase exposures to industrial toxins, and present sanitation challenges. In addition, the effects of climate change have led to concerns about renewed incidence of infectious diseases that disproportionally affect urban populations. We will study how these factors collectively affect a city's health, as well as how these cities can respond to meet the increased challenges.
LSCI 2500 Credits: 4
Chemistry of the Environment *BEST BET*
"Chemistry has contributed to our understanding of environmental issues, but it has also been responsible for some of them. This course will discuss fundamental chemistry concepts to explain the causes of environmental challenges and to offer possible solutions and policies to address them. Topics that will be explored include (i) water quality and access to safe drinking water, (ii) acid rain, (iii) fossil fuels and renewable energy sources, (iv) the chemistry of greenhouse gases, and (v) polymers, plastics and ""green"" alternatives. Students who have completed Chemistry of Life or Chemical Narrative of the Cell should not take this course. This course satisfies the Chemistry requirement for the Interdisciplinary Science and Environmental Studies major."
LSCI 2700 Credits: 4
Energy & Sustainability
"Why are we a ""fossil-fuel-based"" economy? Why have we been unable to transition to a cleaner energy source? Are there feasible alternate sources of energy? What are the arguments for and against fracking? This interdisciplinary course will investigate these questions through physical, chemical, and biological perspectives. The course discusses what energy is, why we need it, and the consequential impact of energy use, including the nexus of energy, air pollution and climate change. It includes a student-led project that applies the science of energy to debate a current energy-related topic. This course is required for the Interdisciplinary Science major."
LSOC 2001 Credits: 4
Sociological Imagination *BEST BET*
In this course, students begin to think about how society works. The course examines relationships among individual identity and experience, social groups and organizations, and social structures. They examine the economic, political, and cultural dimensions of social life and question social arrangements that seem natural or unchangeable. Topics covered include social inequality, politics and power, culture, race and ethnic relations, gender, interaction, and socialization. The course also introduces students to major sociological theorists and sociological research methods.
LSOC 2053 Credits: 4
Sex, Gender & Sexuality in Soc *BEST BET*
In this course, we will closely examine the ways in which sociologists and other scholars have conceptualized and studied sex, gender and sexuality in society, while we try to bring conceptual clarity to these terms and to understand the complex relationships among them. Through this broad survey of the field, our goal is to gain a critical perspective on the ways in which gender and sexuality affect many spheres of social life (at work, in the family, in politics, in the production of scientific knowledge, etc.), drawing real or perceived boundaries of difference that shape the opportunities available to, and the day-to-day experiences and interactions of social subjects. As we will see, we cannot study gender and sexuality without thinking about power.
LSOC 2152 Credits: 4
Politics of Consumption
The course examines why we consume, what we consume, how we consume, and how we have been "civilized" into consumers. It considers how goods attain symbolic meanings, how patterns of social inequality and cultural identities are created and reproduced through consumption, how practices and institutions of everyday life (family, leisure, urban environments) are increasingly organized in relation to consumption. It also discusses the function of consumption for broader political and economic systems, and surveys social movements that gather the discontents of consumerism (environmentalists, anti-globalization activists and moralists).
LTHR 2008 Credits: 0 TO 4
Fall Prdction Wrkshp-By Audtn *BEST BET*
The Lang fall theater production is directed by a visiting professional director. Auditions will be held in the first two weeks of the semester and students may be involved in the production as actors, dramaturgs, technical crew, assistant stage manager, assistant director, and/or with other aspects of the production. An intensive rehearsal process on weekday evenings and Saturdays culminates in a public performance at the end of the semester.
LTHR 2009 Credits: 4
Introduction to Playwriting
This course begins at the beginning, employing a series of exercises to arrive at characters, settings, scenes, and eventually, a one-act play. Student plays are read and discussed in class as they are written and revised. Students also read and discuss a variety of plays to discover individual voice and to understand structure. This course is one of the foundational practice courses required of Theater majors/minors.
LTHR 2021 Credits: 4
Contemporary Drama *BEST BET*
This course explores dramatic literature of the last 40 years, outlining major trends in theatrical production from the 1970s to the present. Each play and playwright will be discussed in cultural context to provide a basis for understanding dramatic literature as a literary art and as a vehicle for performance. Major authors of the period will be considered, with primary emphasis on trends within English speaking theatrical work. Plays will be analyzed through critical reading, performance practice, and selected video and live performance when available. Students will work to establish critical faculties in discussion and participation in class exercises and through a series of short papers on individual plays. This course fulfills the dramatic literature requirement for Theater majors/minors.
LTHR 2025 Credits: 4
Introduction to Directing
The course will focus on the art-science and philosophy of stage direction.The students will read brief history of its development and about major 20th. Century directors and plays by Russian playwright Anton Chekhov (1860-1904). Specific areas to be studied are script analysis of Chekhov's plays, composition, working with actors, and organizing a production. In addition, students intensely will be working with actors on their scenes, focusing and combining different skills, including the understanding of stage space, movement and text.The class will be presenting scenes from Chekhov's plays at the end of the semester.
LTHR 2047 Credits: 4
Radio Drama *BEST BET*
This course examines radio works by Samuel Beckett, Harold Pinter, and Tom Stoppard, placing them in an aesthetic and historical context to examine how the medium shaped and sharpened each writer's practice. Each writer used radio's combination of intimacy and lack of physical constraint to test ideas and techniques that came to define their works and world views. Beckett's ontology, Stoppard's manipulation of the time/space continuum, and Pinter's social activism all take acute shape in their works for broadcast. At the same time, each writer expanded the possibilities for the medium, pushing narrative and psychological boundaries. In the first half of the semester students will be engaged in a critical examination of these seminal works from the perspectives of cultural studies, media, and theatre. In the second half, theory will become practice, with the staging of three of the works for performance before a live audience. Pending approval by the writers' representatives, the event will also be tracked and post-produced for airing on the New School's online radio station, WNSR/newschoolradio.org, which is also programmed and managed by students. This Media & Performance course fulfills the dramatic literature requirement for Theater majors/minors.
LTHR 2050 Credits: 4
Acting Fundamentals
This course is an introduction to basic acting techniques. It challenges student's creativity, stimulates the range of their imagination, and sharpens their abilities to observe themselves and others. Through physical observations, improvs, monologues, and finally a rehearsed scene, students explore the 'everyday practice of the actor'. This course is one of the foundational courses required of Theater majors/minors.
LTHR 2052 Credits: 2
Freeing the Natural Voice *BEST BET*
This course focuses on the progression of vocal exercises developed by Kristin Linklater. It expands the student's expressive range by working on breathing, developing resonance, and freeing specific areas of tension. Students explore the connection between the breath and their emotional and intellectual impulses and learn to connect to any text through freeing their natural voice.
LTHR 2053 Credits: 4
Acting for the Camera
This course is designed to assist students in making the transition from performing in the theater to performing for the camera. Through exercises and scene study, students will explore the terminology of equipment and procedures specific to film acting, learning how to develop their range of physical, vocal, intellectual, and emotional expressiveness while facing the camera. In Fall 2014 the thematic focus of this course is on human rights.
LTHR 2056 Credits: 4
History of American Theater *BEST BET*
This seminar offers an introduction to the history of theater in the United States, focusing predominantly on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Historical context, representative plays, and primary sources and artifacts reveal how theater responded to and also shaped an evolving American identity. This course fulfills the history requirement for Theater majors/minors.
LTHR 2917 Credits: 4
IHD-Harlem Theater & Education
This course will offer Lang students the unique opportunity of engaging in both the practice and history of Theater in Education while working one afternoon a week at the I HAVE A DREAM: HARLEM afterschool drama/literacy program. Students will connect their work with the Second Graders at IHD with seminar classes that will expose them to the field of Theater & Education and delve into the important links between literacy and performance.
LVIS 2001 Credits: 4
Introduction to Art History and Visual Studies
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of art history and the related field of Visual Studies. Based upon close looking at artistic objects, as well other visual and material objects (taken from, for example, film and performance, advertising and design), the class familiarizes students with key terms and debates, and those methods (from formal analysis to interdisciplinary theoretical approaches) that are employed in the interpretation of cultural objects. Through close visual analysis of diverse objects in tandem with a range of readings (drawn from literature and literary criticism; social theory and gender studies; postcolonial and global studies, to name a few), students will gain insight into how one builds an interpretation, stressing the centrality of skills of critical thinking and reading as objects are brought into dialogue with texts. In addition, the class demonstrates how the study of art history entails the very question of what is considered "art," emphasizing that medium, form, and discourse all possess a history. Further elucidating the historical dimensions of the discipline, the course follows its recent expansion under the aegis of Visual Studies, Cultural Studies, and Media Studies.
LVIS 2015 Credits: 4
Photography in Latin America
This course examines the history of Latin American photography, from early photography of the nineteenth century to contemporary conceptual tendencies. We begin with photographic representations of the local landscape and its inhabitants, continue with the establishment of the first photographic studios, and follow with the advent of modernist trends, such as surrealism and abstraction. We approach the strong documentary practice that swings from registering everyday life and autochthonous rituals, to chronicling political upheavalsùas exemplified in the Mexican and Cuban revolutionsù and cataloguing the "disappeared" under the military juntas of Argentina and Chile. We also explore the treatment of labor in 1970's Cuban and Brazilian photo essays, the incorporation of postmodern concepts by Latin American photographers in the 1990s, and photographic representations of narco-culture in Colombia and Mexico. We discuss critical problems such as: realism, indigenism, social commentary, propaganda, nationalism, violence, and ethics.
LVIS 2201 Credits: 4
Anthology Film Archives: Living History of Moving Image Arts
Engage with the collections of the Anthology Film Archives (AFA), one of the world's premiere institutions for the preservation, collection and exhibition of moving image arts. Co-taught by Curator of Collections at AFA, Andrew Lampert, students will pursue a hands-on, immersive study of the histories/theories and contemporary practices of art and the moving image and participate in the legacyûand the futureûof this essential New York cultural institution. While attending seminars and screenings at TNS, AFA, museums and artists' studios, students will be asked to engage in research projects that will be incorporated into essentialcinema.org, AFA's forthcoming media collections online archive which will feature streaming video, audio, periodicals and papers from the collections. 2 Student Fellows will be selected to work closely with faculty to orchestrate research for and curate elements of the archive.
NARB 1001 Credits: 3
Arabic Level 1 *BEST BET*
This first course in Arabic introduces the Modern Standard Arabic alphabet and sound system (FuS-Ha) along with basic conversation using the Levantine dialect (the language of Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, and Jordan). Students acquire basic reading, writing, and speaking skills while learning about contemporary cultures of the Middle East.
NARB 1101 Credits: 4
Arabic Intro 1 *BEST BET*
This course is an introduction to Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) intended for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. It aims at laying the foundation for the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The students will spend the semester recognizing and producing Arabic language sounds accurately, talk about simple daily life situations, read and understand words, phrases, and sentences, and write various forms of the Arabic alphabet, graduating on to basic sentences, short notes and memos. This course is based on the communicative approach in language teaching and learning. It focuses on the functional usage of the language and on communication in context.
NARB 3707 Credits: 2
Conversational Arabic
This class will focus on Levantine conversation to help students communicate smoothly. Course material includes songs, films, TV shows, and articles where topics such as family, education, politics, social changes, etc., are explored. Prerequisite: Arabic Level 4 or equivalent.
NARH 2102 Credits: 3
Museum Studies: Intro *BEST BET*
Museums have always been a contested site of representation: who decides what artifacts are collected and displayed, whose story is represented, how is it represented, who has access to the museum. What a society values enough to collect, how these artifacts are interpreted and displayed, and how access to the museum is granted or denied reflects and in turn constructs collective identity and memory. This course will critically discuss the history and role of museums, questions of collecting, representation, architecture, display, issues in museum education and access, and different types of public and private funding.
NARH 2200 Credits: 3
The Arts and Social Engagement *BEST BET*
A poem can change the world. Or just one person's life. What explains the connection between an artwork and an individual, a wider public, a world? This course serves as an introduction to a pathway of courses that investigate this question by examining the variety of ways in which the arts make and meet people. We explore different modes of engagement: from the creation of stories that help us imagine and understand the complex lives of others to the research that informs this process; from criticism and curation that deeply analyze artworks to arts in the service of political ends; from the institutions and markets that channel the arts to creative therapies that help heal wounds. Different publics build and need different artworks, so we also look at how networks û cities, institutions, collectives û shape, deter, or support the arts. We think through what arts and engagement mean: who defines these ideas, to what ends, for what purposes, for how long? Case studies ground our broad investigation into how imagination and creativity connect to societal insight and action. The course also introduces students to the variety of theory, practice, and experience in the arts in which New School faculty are engaged.
NARH 2800 Credits: 3
Interpreting Cities and Spaces: Ways of Looking *BEST BET*
To fully experience and understand city life, one must see the richness of urban shapes and spaces. This foundational course examines cities and spaces through the prism of the eye, focusing on the interpretation of visual representations of change and continuity in the context of urban history and urban theories. Through images, graphics, maps, photos, films, and paintings, the layers of shapes, spaces, cultures, functions, and symbols condensed in the contemporary city are explored. Visual examples are found in Barcelona, Mexico City, and New York City. In consultation with the instructor, students, working individually and in groups, select themes and approaches in different cities, applying categories of urban analysis and visual representation to understand the historical origins of contemporary urban challenges and expectations for the future. Students learn to recognize categories of visual representation and analyze landscapes, infrastructures, and architecture.
NCHM 1001 Credits: 2
Chinese Level 1
This is the first part of a three-course elementary sequence that introduces the fundamentals of Mandarin Chinese speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The goal of the course is for students to acquire essential vocabulary, an understanding of sentence patterns in a communicative context, and a solid foundation in tone recognition and pronunciation. As the course develops, students acquire the ability to hold simple conversations in Chinese in such contexts as offering greetings, introducing family members, and discussing times and dates. Simplified characters are used to introduce reading and writing. No prior knowledge of Chinese is assumed.
NCHM 1101 Credits: 4
Chinese Intro 1 *BEST BET*
NCHM 2001 Credits: 2
Chinese Level 3
This is the third part of a three-course elementary sequence that introduces the fundamentals of Mandarin Chinese speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The goal at Level 3 is to continue building vocabulary and to practice sentence patterns in communicative contexts. Students converse about everyday life, such as shopping, making appointments, and school life. Simplified characters are used for reading and writing instruction. Prerequisite: Chinese Level 2, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
NCHM 3101 Credits: 4
Adv.1: Chinese Pop Culture in Media: Sitcoms and Films *BEST BET*
This course introduces Chinese contemporary society through the dynamic lens of pop culture and media. While advancing Chinese language proficiency level, students will be fully exposed to various media resources. Music videos, major newspaper articles, episodes and clips of popular sitcoms and films (such as "Dwelling Like a Snail" (Woju), "Golden Marriage" (Jinhun), and "Unknown Pleasures" (Ren xiaoyao)) will be studied and discussed in detail. The class will focus on various themes including Chinese urbanism, gender politics and youth culture. Colloquial speech/vocabulary, slang, grammatical points and structures will be introduced and explained for each of the media productions.
Prerequisite: Chinese Intermediate 2, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor
NCST 2103 Credits: 3
Debates in Race and Ethnicity *BEST BET*
Through an interdisciplinary engagement with contemporary literature and scholarship on race and ethnicity, this course considers the following questions: How do race and ethnicity organize the social world? What are the historical conditions under which the various definitions of racial and ethnic difference emerge? What is at stake in the institutional recognition of race and ethnicity, particularly as these categories come to be defined in relation to other nodes of difference such as gender and class? How do individuals utilize labels of racial and ethnic difference to develop an understanding of the self in relation to the social and political worlds they inhabit? As an introductory course to the curricular area in Race and Ethnicity Studies, the class provides an overview of different areas within this complex field, including Latino Studies, African-American Studies, Asian-American Studies, and Whiteness Studies.
NFDS 2080 Credits: 3
Intro to Food Design: We Eat What We Are
This course is designed as a source of inspiration to get students interested and involved in the rapidly growing field of Food Design. Taken separately, both Food and Design are highly relevant subjects onto themselves; Food is our most basic need, Design is one of today's most valued platforms for innovation and problem solving. Taken together: relevance and passion! Food Design is an emerging trans-discipline concerned with any action that can improve our relationship to food in a variety of ways and instances. These actions can focus on the design of the edible product itself or its context, including food objects, spaces, process and practices. This course is meant to empower students with the impact that design can have on concrete situations they encounter on a daily basis with regards to food. The course is conceived as a design project, with the possibility of hands-on components. The scope is kept close to familiar and immediate issues that students can grasp and identify with. The personal projects each student works on is related to their personal lives and surrounding environment, so as to engage design issues relating to food through a learning experience in which ongoing results are examined by firsthand experience.
NFDS 2101 Credits: 3
American Culinary History: From the Erie Canal to the Food Network *BEST BET*
What does the Erie Canal have to do with Wonder Bread? Which American war gave us condensed soup? Why did American farmers turn away from organic farming in the first place? This course examines the historical, cultural, social, technological, and economic events that have influenced what Americans eat today. It is an action-packed history of home economists and fancy restaurateurs, family farmers and corporate giants, street vendors and captains of industry, mom-and-pop grocers and massive food conglomerates, burger barons and vegetarians, the hungry and the affluent, hard-hitting advertisers and health food advocates. All these players have shaped the contentious American foodscape of the 21st century.
NFRN 1001 Credits: 2
French Level 1
This is the first course of a three-term sequence that introduces the fundamentals of the French language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students acquire elementary grammar (present tense), learn to express negation and ask questions, and practice by conversing and writing about university life, hobbies, friends, and family. They learn about France and the Francophone world while building their communicative skills.
NFRN 1002 Credits: 2
French Level 2
This is the second course of a three-term sequence that introduces students to the fundamentals of the French language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. They continue to study elementary grammar (irregular present tenses, past tense, pronouns) and practice by conversing and writing about leisure, celebrations, holidays, and travel. They continue to learn about French and Francophone cultures.
NFRN 1003 Credits: 4
French Introductory Intensive 1
This is an accelerated course for beginners with little or no knowledge of French. Students learn the fundamentals of the French language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. They acquire elementary grammar skills (present and past tenses, pronouns), learn how to express negation and ask questions, and practice by conversing and writing about university life, friends and family, hobbies and leisure, celebrations, holidays, and travel. They learn about France and the Francophone world while building their communicative skills.
NFRN 1003 Credits: 4
French Introductory Intensive 1 *BEST BET*
This is an accelerated course for beginners with little or no knowledge of French. Students learn the fundamentals of the French language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. They acquire elementary grammar skills (present and past tenses, pronouns), learn how to express negation and ask questions, and practice by conversing and writing about university life, friends and family, hobbies and leisure, celebrations, holidays, and travel. They learn about France and the Francophone world while building their communicative skills.
NFRN 1004 Credits: 4
French Introductory Intensive 2
This accelerated course is a continuation of Introductory Intensive and concludes the study of the fundamentals of the French language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students continue the study of elementary grammar (present and past tenses, expressing negation, asking questions, and using pronouns). They practice by conversing and writing about shopping, food, daily life, health, technology, and ecology. While enhancing their communicative skills, students continue to learn about France and the Francophone world. Prerequisite:French Introductory Intensive 1 or the equivalent.
NFRN 1101 Credits: 4
French Intro 1
NFRN 2001 Credits: 2
French Level 3
This is the last part of a three-course elementary sequence that introduces the fundamentals of the French language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students conclude their study of elementary grammar (the conditional mood, reflexive verbs, and relative pronouns) and practice by communicating about shopping, food, daily life, health, technology, and ecology. While enhancing their communicative skills, students continue to learn about France and the Francophone world. Prerequisite: French Level 2 or the equivalent.
NFRN 2002 Credits: 2
French Level 4
Students begin intermediate-level study of French. Review and reinforcement of some of the more complex grammatical structures of the language is combined with cultural readings and viewings of short films and online materials. Students refine their writing and verbal skills through brief compositions, class presentations, and sustained classroom conversation in French. Prerequisite: French Level 3, French Introductory Intensive 2, or the equivalent.
NFRN 2101 Credits: 4
French Intermediate 1 *BEST BET*
NFRN 3001 Credits: 2
French Level 5
This course is the second course of the Intermediate-level French sequence. Continued review and reinforcement of complex grammatical structures of the language are combined with the study of cultural readings, shorts films and online materials. Students refine their writing and verbal skills through brief compositions, class presentations, and sustained conversation in French. Prerequisite: French Level 4, Intermediate 1, or the equivalent.
NFRN 3101 Credits: 4
Adv 1: La France ? l'?cran *BEST BET*
In this course, students will be introduced to outstanding French films /directors from the New Wave to recent years. Films will be studied as a window into modern French history and culture, in particular social and sexual politics, memory, and national identity in the aftermath of May 1968. Films will be complemented by music clips, TV shows, and newspaper articles. Prerequisite: French Intermediate 2 or equivalent.
NGRM 1001 Credits: 2
German Level 1
A first course in German for those with no previous knowledge of the language. Students learn basic speaking, reading, and writing skills while discovering aspects of German culture. Class activities include interactive exercises and role-playing. Principles of grammar and syntax are introduced as students become more comfortable with the spoken language.
NGRM 1001 Credits: 2
German Level 1 *BEST BET*
A first course in German for those with no previous knowledge of the language. Students learn basic speaking, reading, and writing skills while discovering aspects of German culture. Class activities include interactive exercises and role-playing. Principles of grammar and syntax are introduced as students become more comfortable with the spoken language.
NGRM 1002 Credits: 2
German Level 2
Designed for students with elementary knowledge of German, this course reviews simple grammar and introduces more complex grammatical and syntactical elements of the language. Students expand their vocabulary and knowledge of German culture in a context that emphasizes communication skills. Prerequisite: German Level 1, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
NGRM 1003 Credits: 4
German Introductory Intensive *BEST BET*
This is a course for beginners who want to progress rapidly in learning German. Students acquire basic speaking, reading, and writing skills while learning about German culture. The emphasis is on developing communication skills.
NHUM 2001 Credits: 3
Introduction to Digital Humanities *BEST BET*
How do computers enable us to rethink, reform and reorient every stage of intellectual process? How might collaboration and other forms of digital creativity allow us to understand a book, an archive, a painting, a space, an idea, a film -- or our own minds -- differently? In this course, we use digital tools to help us re-conceptualize what the humanities can be. Educating ourselves about the history, present and future of computerized intellectual work, we address distinctions between digital "work" and digital "play;" virtual humanness; and whether digital worlds alter intellectual categories like "art," "culture," or "society." Digital tools not only allow us to share our ideas and knowledge, but also encourage creative expression that goes beyond any one discipline or mode of communication. In addition to writing, the course focuses on making time, space, ideas, narrative and argumentation visible. Exercises emphasize collaboration, innovation and design rather than the individualism, competition and "knowledge banking," that can be typical of scholarship in the analogue humanities world. Readings include selections from Anne Balsamo, Designing Culture (2011), Anne Burdick et. al., Digital_Humanities (2012), Stephen L. Carter, Civility, (1999) Cathy N. Davidson, Now You See It (2010), Lawrence Lessig, Free Culture (2004), Marshall Poe, A History of Communications (2010), and Siva Vaidhyanathan, The Googlization of Everything (2011). This course prepares students to participate in courses and projects associated with the Humanities Action Lab.
NITL 1001 Credits: 2
Italian Level 1
This is the first course of a three-term sequence that introduces students to the fundamentals of the Italian language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students acquire elementary grammar skills (present and past tenses of regular and irregular verbs) and practice by conversing and writing about themselves, friends, family, hobbies, and university and professional life. They learn about Italian culture while building their communicative skills.
NITL 1002 Credits: 2
Italian Level 2
This is the second course of a three-term sequence that introduces students to the fundamentals of the Italian language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students acquire elementary grammar (present and past tense of regular and irregular verbs) and practice by conversing and writing about themselves, friends, family, hobbies, and university and professional life. They learn about Italian culture while building their communicative skills.
NITL 1101 Credits: 4
Italian Intro 1 *BEST BET*
NITL 3714 Credits: 2
Assaggi di Cultura Italiana
"This intermediate level conversation course offers a taste of various topics in Italian culture, society and customs. Speaking strategies and grammar structures are reviewed and explored through readings and discussions of art, cinema, music, news. We will also interview ""real Italians"" and point out at Italian events in the City during the duration of the course. Students are welcome and encouraged to actively participate and bring their own Italian experience to share in class."
NJPN 1003 Credits: 4
Japanese Intro Intensive
This is an accelerated course for beginners with no knowledge of Japanese. Students learn the fundamentals of the Japanese language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. They acquire elementary grammar (present and past tenses, expressing negation, asking questions, using adjectives) and practice by conversing a daily life. Students also learn 46 hiragana, 46 katakana and 43 kanji in one semester. They also learn about Japanese cultures as well as traditions while developing communicative skills. (0 or 4 credits)
NJPN 1101 Credits: 4
Japanese Intro 1
This course is designed to introduce elementary Japanese to students with no previous background in the language. It is aimed at developing basic proficiency in the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. This course introduces the three Japanese writing systems from the beginning of the semester. Students are required to learn all 46 Hiragana and 46 Katakana, as well as Kanji (Chinese characters).
NJPN 2101 Credits: 4
Japanese Intermediate 1 *BEST BET*
Intended to enhance and increase proficiency beyond the basic level in the four language skills. Students are expected to have a good command of both Hiragana and Katakana. Students develop familiarity with Japanese culture in a Japanese-speaking environment. More Kanji (Chinese characters) are introduced during the semester.
Japanese Intro 2, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
NJPN 3101 Credits: 4
Advanced 1: Japanese Pop Culture *BEST BET*
This advanced Japanese language course introduces students to contemporary Japanese society and culture from the high growth period of the 1960s to the bubble economy of the 1980s, and to the recent two decades of stagnation and a "lost generation." The course aims to expand oral and written expression, and broaden socio-cultural knowledge through the use of mass media and popular culture. Each week will explore a specific theme using films, TV dramas, popular music, anime, and Manga. This advanced Japanese language course introduces students to contemporary Japanese society and culture from the high growth period of the 1960s to the bubble economy of the 1980s, and to the recent two decades of stagnation and a "lost generation." The course aims to expand oral and written expression, and broaden socio-cultural knowledge through the use of mass media and popular culture. Each week will explore a specific theme using films, TV dramas, popular music, anime, and Manga.
Japanese Intermediate 2, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
NPHI 2610 Credits: 3
Critical Thinking: Informal Logic *BEST BET*
In this course, we study and apply the principles and methods that distinguish good reasoning from poor reasoning. Working with this toolkit of techniques for evaluating arguments, we examine the logic that shapes contemporary debates about politics, media, art, and science. As a complement to the practical nature of this exercise, we also reflect on the psychological structures that make critical thinking an essential aspect of constructive civic engagement and human well-being in general.
NPRT 1001 Credits: 2
Brazilian Portuguese Level 1
A first course in Portuguese for those with no previous knowledge of the language. Students acquire basic speaking, reading, and writing skills while learning about Brazilian culture. Class activities include interactive exercises and role-playing. The aim is for students to develop the ability to use the language effectively for practical communication.
NPRT 1700 Credits: 2
Portuguese for Spanish Speakers
This is a beginner's Portuguese course for students with a strong Spanish language background and little or no knowledge of Portuguese. They learn to use their knowledge of Spanish to gain competency and confidence in speaking Portuguese. They learn to minimize the confusions that can result from the similarities of the languages. The emphasis is on eliminating Spanish phonetics, vocabulary, and sentence structure from their Portuguese speech. After completing this course, students can take Portuguese Level 3. Prerequisite: fluency in Spanish.
NRSN 1001 Credits: 2
Russian Level 1
A first course in Russian for those with no previous knowledge of the language. Students acquire basic speaking, reading, and writing skills, including the Cyrillic alphabet, while learning about Russian culture. Class activities include interactive exercises and role-playing. Principles of grammar and syntax are introduced as students become more comfortable with the spoken language.
NSLN 1001 Credits: 2
Introduction to Sign Language *BEST BET*
The totally visual language of deaf people is now the third most commonly used language in the United States. This course introduces the culture and communication methods of the contemporary deaf community, focusing on the experience of navigating social interactions using signs, gestures, and visual cues. Topics explored and practiced include the psychology of deafness, finger spelling, the art of interpreting, and the silent speech of body language. At the end of the course, each student completes a final project dealing with a particular aspect of the language and culture of the deaf and hard of hearing.
NSLN 1011 Credits: 2
American Sign Language: Level 1
This is a beginner's course in the system of American Sign Language (ASL), a form of communication used by thousands of deaf Americans and Canadians. ASL is an expressive, versatile, full-fledged language and not a hodgepodge of charades and hand movements. It has its own grammar, poetry, and puns. Students learn the techniques essential to basic ASL conversations, including finger spelling and facial expressions, through demonstrations and class activities, including interactive exercises and role-playing. They become familiar with the history of deaf society in the United States. This course is led by a deaf native signer. There is no prerequisite for this course.
NSLN 1012 Credits: 2
American Sign Language: Level 2
A course for people with a basic understanding of American Sign Language (ASL) who wish to acquire more sophisticated communication skills. Guided by a deaf native signer, students develop greater conversational fluency, expand their sign vocabulary, and improve their fingerspelling ability. Practical role-playing exercises and individual presentations of the ASL face, hand, and body language give them the tools to communicate with deaf and hard of hearing people in a variety of social and professional settings. Some assigned projects take students into the deaf community. In class, students are strongly encouraged to communicate using ASL only. Prerequisite: American Sign Language Level 1 or the equivalent or permission of the instructor.
NSPN 1001 Credits: 2
Spanish Level 1
This is the first course of a four-term sequence that introduces the fundamentals of the Spanish language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students acquire elementary grammar (present and future tenses), learn to ask questions, and practice by conversing and writing about family members, school and leisure activities, likes and dislikes, time, and weather. They learn about Spanish and Latin American culture while building their communicative skills.
NSPN 1001 Credits: 2
Spanish Level 1 *BEST BET*
This is the first course of a four-term sequence that introduces the fundamentals of the Spanish language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students acquire elementary grammar (present and future tenses), learn to ask questions, and practice by conversing and writing about family members, school and leisure activities, likes and dislikes, time, and weather. They learn about Spanish and Latin American culture while building their communicative skills.
NSPN 1002 Credits: 2
Spanish Level 2 *BEST BET*
This is the second course of a four-term sequence that introduces the fundamentals of the Spanish language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students continue using the basic grammatical structures learned in Level 1 and learn new ones, such as past tenses, pronouns, reflexive constructions, and demonstratives. They practice by conversing and writing about topics such as food, daily routines, shopping, seasons, and travel. They continue learning about Spanish and Latin American culture while building communicative skills.
NSPN 1003 Credits: 4
Spanish Introductory Intensive 1
This is an accelerated course for beginners with little or no knowledge of Spanish. Students learn the fundamentals of the Spanish language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. They acquire a wide range of elementary communicative competencies such as using the present, past, and future tenses; expressing likes and dislikes; describing things; and asking questions. They practice conversing and writing about themselves and others, school and leisure activities, time, weather, and shopping. They learn about Spanish and Latin American culture while building their communicative skills.
NSPN 1004 Credits: 4
Spanish Introductory Intensive 2
This accelerated course is the continuation of Introductory Intensive and completes the study of the fundamentals of the Spanish language. Students extend their knowledge of essential grammar, learning how to express opinions (past and present subjunctive), and make conjectures (conditional and future). They continue learning about Spanish and Latin American cultures while developing communication skills. Prerequisite: Spanish Introductory Intensive 1 or the equivalent.
NSPN 1101 Credits: 4
Spanish Intro 1 *BEST BET*
NSPN 2001 Credits: 2
Spanish Level 3
This is the third course in a four-term sequence that introduces the fundamentals of the Spanish language through speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students build on the basic grammar learned in previous courses and go on to learn the different uses of past tenses, combinations of pronouns, and the various forms of commands while learning to construct complex sentences. They practice by conversing and writing about topics such as celebrations, health, technology, and personal relationships. As in previous courses, they continue learning about Spanish and Latin American cultures. Prerequisite: Spanish Level 2, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
NSPN 2101 Credits: 4
Spanish Intermediate 1
NSPN 2731 Credits: 1
Taller de Espa±ol *BEST BET*
This course is for students with a very basic intermediate fluency who wish to refine their speaking skills and complement their language class with a practical session focused on conversation. Students in this course will practice the same topics covered in Intermediate 1 and will expand them into conversational situations. In addition to cultural topics, in this course students will focus on retelling events in the past,expressing their opinions about issues that affect their lives and others, describing habits in the past and comparing them with current ones, giving instructions and directions, describing different kinds of housing and finding the right roommate, talking about their future and that of others, etc. Prerequisite:Intro 2.
NSPN 3001 Credits: 2
Spanish Level 5
This intermediate-level course assumes familiarity with basic Spanish grammar. The class reviews the most commonly used grammatical structures to build fluency. Students practice expressing themselves clearly and correctly using present, past, and future tenses. They also review and practice the subjunctive, the conditional, and compound tenses. They are expected to construct complex sentences and paragraphs both in speaking and in writing, including idiomatic expressions, relative constructions, and correct sequence of tenses. Students learn about Spanish and Latin American cultures by reading and viewing authentic materials, such as magazines, newspaper articles, broadcasts, and websites. Prerequisite: Spanish Level 4, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
NSPN 3101 Credits: 4
Spanish Advanced 1:Cine y cultura hispana *BEST BET*
This course will offer an overview of women's artistic production in Latin America and will consider how their "texts" intersect, reflect, disrupt or resist canonical literary movements in Hispanic tradition. The material to be covered spans from short stories, novel, poetry, painting of the 20th century to film and documentaries which can reinforce students understanding of the different characteristics of women production. Students will familiarize themselves with canonical authors such as Isabel Allende, Laura Esquivel, Rosario Ferr?, Delmira Agustini and also with less well-known author such as Giovanna Pollarolo. Through the analysis and the close reading of these texts students will also sharpen their language skills.
PLAH 1059 Credits: 3
NYC: Exhibitions *BEST BET*
"This course will focus on museums, art galleries and auction houses in the city of New York. These institutions are repositories of material culture that promote public education and personal growth. Students will learn about the practices these institutions use to collect, protect, preserve and educate. This will be accomplished through the careful examination of objects. This careful looking will be aided by classroom lectures, writing assignments, group discussions, research and class presentations. The course will also involve trips to a variety of New York City art galleries, auction houses, and museums: for example, The Brooklyn Museum of Art, The Studio Museum of Harlem, The Museum of the Moving Image, and The Brooklyn Historical Society. When possible, this will include behind the scenes tours of museum work areas not usually seen by the general public. Students will be asked to create a virtual exhibition using the blog feature in Blackboard.""
Open to: University undergraduate degree students, freshman and sophomores only.
"
PLAH 2001 Credits: 3
The Nude: History & Theory
Few images are as powerful as the nude. The unclothed figure, whether male or female, can embody everything from beauty and strength to suffering and ecstasy. It can arouse the strongest desire or provoke the most violent outrage. This course will use traditional art historical approaches as well as newer methodologies such as psychoanalysis and feminism to gain a critical understanding of the nude. Although the course will closely examine paintings and sculpture by Western masters such as Michelangelo, Rubens, and Picasso, it will also explore the immensely varied ways in which different cultures and different historical periods have envisioned such a seemingly timeless and universal subject. This will involve looking at pre-historic art, non-Western works, and attempts by contemporary artists of both genders to reclaim and reinvent this age-old tradition. The course will discuss as well the effect of popular culture on depictions of the nude and, in particular, how costume and fashion both determine and are determined by ideal body types.
Open to: University undergraduate degree students, freshman and sophomores only. Pre-requisites: first-year university writing course and at least one prior history or methods course in art, media, film, or visual culture.
PLAH 2002 Credits: 3
Art in the XXI Century
Historicizing the contemporary art field may seem oxymoronic, and yet in the last few years numerous scholars and curators have begun to do just that. They ask: "What is Contemporary Art?" Art in the XXI Century will use this question as a springboard to investigate the art world circuit of the last two decades. Although the course will focus on the post-2000 years, the first few classes will reach back to 1989, a historical turning point marked by the rise of globalization. Each class will be dedicated to exploring a specific theme or medium that has been the subject of much recent discourse (e.g. the archival impulse; biennialization; digital art). Such an undertaking is critical to students interested in better understanding the principal tendencies in contemporary art, as well as theories on the "contemporary" (as opposed to the "modern" or "postmodern").
Open to: University undergraduate degree students, freshman and sophomores only. Pre-requisites: first-year university writing course and at least one prior history or methods course in art, media, film, or visual culture.
PLAH 2011 Credits: 3
Pre-Hispanic Art and Design of South America
This course covers Pre-Hispanic art and design of the Andes, the Caribbean, and Mesoamerica. It begins with the Olmecs c. 2000 BCE and ends with the Spanish conquest of the Aztecs, 1519-1521. Although this terminates Mesoamerican art proper, the course also explores post-conquest Indo-Hispano art that was neither purely indigenous nor Colonial, but a syncretic hybrid formed and shaped by both New and Old World cultures. Regarding the Andes, the course begins with Chavin de Huantar c.1200 BCE and terminates with the Inca and their conquest by the Spanish in 1534. Also to be studied will be the art and culture of the Taino that inhabited areas of the Caribbean. The type of art and design the course will investigate both formally and in context includes architecture, painting, sculpture, textiles and costume, performance or ritual-based art, ceramics, lapidary arts, manuscripts, and featherwork. Pathways: Art and Design History
Open to: University undergraduat degree students, freshman, and sophomores only. Pre-requisite(s): first-year university writing course and at least one prior history or methods course in art, media, film, or visual culture.
PLAH 2025 Credits: 3
Art and Architecture of Ancient Greece and Rome *BEST BET*
This course presents the history of the architecture, art, and material culture of the ancient Greeks and Romans from the Iron Age to Late Antiquity (11th century B.C.E. û 5th century C.E.). It provides a chronological survey of the cultures from the fall of Mycenae to the fall of Rome, considering the interactions between Greece and Rome during the Hellenistic period and the influences of the Persians, Macedonians, and Etruscans on art production in the Mediterranean. Within the chronological framework the historical, political, and social context of the creation and reception of art in antiquity will be considered. Questions of tradition, stylistic innovation, and function of artwork in the ancient world will be addressed through readings and class discussions. The Greek and Roman Galleries at the Metropolitan Museum of Art will provide students with the opportunity to experience ancient sculpture and painting in a contemporary context and will inspire their own final research projects.
Open to: University undergraduate degree students, freshmen and sophomores only. Pre-requisites: first-year university writing course and at least one prior history or methods course in art, media, film, or visual culture.
PLAH 2030 Credits: 3
Baroque Art *BEST BET*
"""Baroque"" is the designated term for the style of 17th and early 18th century European painting, sculpture, architecture, design, and music. Baroque describes any artwork whose theme or style is extravagant, ornate, or excessive. The class will explore the Baroque era, which produced artists such as Bernini, Caravaggio, Hals, Rembrandt, Rubens, Vermeer, and Velasquez. Baroque artists pushed art to its limits and beyond, in order to attract attention in a culture of increasing excess. Artists emerged as individual entrepreneurs, while their products became important commodities as capitalism developed. There were new subjects, such as landscape and genre painting. In addition, there were new approaches to old subjects, including gods, saints, heroes, and portraiture. The class will also explore the baroque attitude, which is still a major component of art today, by connecting baroque themes and styles to contemporary artworks. Pathway: Art and Design History
Open to: University undergraduate degree students, freshman and sophomores only. Pre-requisites: first-year university writing course and at least one prior history or methods course in art, media, film, or visual culture.
"
PLAH 2050 Credits: 3
African Art
This course will focus on three aspects of African art and culture, starting with an introduction to traditional religious and philosophical thought. This will be followed by an overview of ancient kingdoms, specifically, the Congo, Benin, Yoruba and Akan kingdoms. The course concludes with an overview of village communities, including the Dogon, Bamana, Dan and Senufo peoples. Pathway: Art and Design History
Open to: University undergraduate degree students, freshman and sophomores only. Pre-requisites: first-year university writing course and at least one prior history or methods course in art, media, film, or visual culture.
PLAH 2150 Credits: 3
Eighteenth Century Art and Design
This course explores the amazing 18th century, which produced both artistic evolution û from the Baroque to the Rococo û and revolution (Neoclassicism and Romanticism) that was political and industrial as well. It was a great era of handcrafted design, with fashion and interiors playing leading social and economic roles. Class members will gain greater knowledge of 18th century styles and their relationship to society, as well as greater awareness of Enlightenment thought and literature. Course work will be comprised of group and independent research, written papers, and oral presentations. Pathway: Art and Design History
Open to: University undergraduate degree students, freshman and sophomores only. Pre-requisites: first-year university writing course and at least one prior history or methods course in art, media, film, or visual culture.
PLAH 2201 Credits: 0
Modern Art & Postmoderism: Lecture
(Disc. Sec Reqd) *BEST BET*
The 20th century changed everything about art: where it was located, who made it, who it was made for, what it was made of, how it was made, and what was and wasn't considered art. This class will explore these changes in terms of ongoing tensions and connections, including those between object and image, abstraction and figuration, material and spiritual, accumulation and appropriation, nature and culture. There will be readings from artists' writings and critical histories that substantiate these ideas, along with class discussions, written projects, and field trips to appropriate venues. We will discuss individual artists and representative art movements from throughout the century, including (among others) Cubism, Futurism, Constructivism, de Stijl, Expressionism (Early, Abstract, and Neo), Pop, Minimal, Conceptual, Land, Body, and Performance. Pathway: Art and Design History
Open to: University undergraduate degree students. Pre-requisites: first-year university writing course and at least one prior history or methods course in art, media, film, or visual culture. Co-requisite: PLAH 2202 Recitation.
PLAH 2202 Credits: 3
Modern Art & Postmodernism: Recitation *BEST BET*
Open to: University undergraduate degree students. Pre-requisites: first-year university writing course and at least one prior history or methods course in art, media, film, or visual culture. Co-requisite: PLAH 2201 Lecture.
PLAH 2217 Credits: 3
Pop: Art & Popular Culture
Since the beginning of the 20th century, artists and designers have make use of elements from popular culture in their work. Early examples of such usage include the bits of newspaper attached by Pablo Picasso to his Cubist canvases, the magazine photographs collaged by Hannah Hoch to create unique Dada personages, and the American products and signage that appear in Stuart Davis's paintings of the 1920s and 1930s. By the 1950s Jasper johns was painting copies of the American flag, while in the 1960s Andy Warhol and Claes Oldenburg (among others) reproduced every aspect of popular culture, from movie stars to junk food. Since then, artists and designers have increasingly drawn upon sources that include television, films, advertising, and cyberspace for both the style and substance of their work. This class will explore both past and present connections between art, design, and popular culture through readings, discussions, slides, videos, field trips and presentations. Pathway: Art and Design History
Open to: University undergraduate degree students, freshman and sophomores only. Pre-requisites: first-year university writing course and at least one prior history or methods course in art, media, film, or visual culture.
PLFS 1050 Credits: 3
NYC: Fashion
"This course looks at the social construction of "New York Fashion" as an aesthetic style, practice, imaginary and industry, as well as a place in the global fashion world. Exploring its meanings through discourse, material culture, image and film, we will treat "New York Fashion" as an object of inquiry whose meanings are continuously produced, negotiated, and defined. Some topics of discussion include the city's rise as a fashion capital, it's cultural politics with a Parisian regime, debates between high culture and mass fashion, and the transformations to its cultural geography, styles, and streets. Students will examine the connections between New York-based designers, culture industries (ex. modeling), varying fashion institutions (ex. museums, education), media and technology - social forces that powerfully shape the cultural and political economic significance of New York to a greater globalized world. With ample opportunity to explore the city, students will be required to carry out research projects on fashion within the ""field"" of ""New York.""
Open to: University undergraduate degree students, freshmen and sophomores only.
"
PLFS 2006 Credits: 3
Fashion and Celebrity Culture
Andy Warhol's maxim that "everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes" couldn't ring more true than today, but the origins of celebrity culture are deeper than we imagine. This course focuses on both contemporary and historical "star studies" in order to understand our cultural fascination with media figures. We address such topics as myth-making, glamour, notoriety, tabloid and gossip culture, reality and makeover television, and the role of social media in mediating identities by consulting a variety of "star texts:" images, advertisements, fashion editorials, music videos, films, and museum exhibitions all figure into our analysis. Through case studies of prominent actors, designers, and socialites, we will consider who benefits from our celebrity culture and how fashion and image play a role in constructing our understanding of celebrities. Students will explore topics through critical analysis and a final project involving research of a facet of celebrity culture.
Open to: University undergraduate degree students, freshman and sophomores only. Pre-requisite(s): first-year university writing course and at least one prior history or methods course in art, media, film, or visual culture.
PLHT 1000 Credits: 3
Objects as History: Prehistory to Industrialization
This course introduces students to major trends in world history and to the considered study of objects as expressions of a particular place and time. Its structure is roughly chronological, beginning in prehistory and continuing until the dawn of mass industrialization - a development that occurred at different times for different cultures. The focus will be on objects, from ordinary tools of daily life to extraordinary monuments of skill and design, on display in local museum collections. These objects will be explored in terms of how and why they were made, by whom and for whom, how they were used, what they meant to their users, and what social structures are embedded in them.
Open to: University undergraduate degree students, freshman and sophomores only.
PLHT 1000 Credits: 3
Objects as History: Prehistory to Industrialization *BEST BET*
This course introduces students to major trends in world history and to the considered study of objects as expressions of a particular place and time. Its structure is roughly chronological, beginning in prehistory and continuing until the dawn of mass industrialization - a development that occurred at different times for different cultures. The focus will be on objects, from ordinary tools of daily life to extraordinary monuments of skill and design, on display in local museum collections. These objects will be explored in terms of how and why they were made, by whom and for whom, how they were used, what they meant to their users, and what social structures are embedded in them.
Open to: University undergraduate degree students, freshman and sophomores only.
PLVS 2006 Credits: 3
Bollywood: From Local Industry to Global Brand *BEST BET*
Over the last few decades, Bollywood has undergone a dramatic transformation. It has gone from being the commercial film industry located in Mumbai (formerly Bombay) to becoming an easily recognizable global brand identified with distinctive and increasingly influential aesthetics that go beyond cinema to encompass a transnational industry that includes TV shows, music, fashion, etc. Bollywood contributes decisively to make the Indian film industry the largest in the world in number of spectators and movies made, and second in revenue, trailing only Hollywood. At the same time, the perception of Bollywood has often been confined to a few stereotypical images that fail to grasp its real breath and diversity. In this course we will explore Bollywood's aesthetics, styles and main themes, and evaluate its current situation and trends, focusing on its ongoing metamorphosis into a global brand and its reception and growing impact worldwide. Pathways: Visual Studies
Open to: University undergraduate degree students, freshman and sophomores only. Pre-requisite(s): first-year university writing course and at least one prior history or methods course in art, media, film, or visual culture.
PLVS 2013 Credits: 3
Graphic Design: A History *BEST BET*
Open to: University undergraduate degree students, freshman and sophomores only. Pre-requisite(s): first-year university writing course and at least one prior history or methods course in art, media, film, or visual culture.
PSAM 1028 Credits: 3
Web Design Basics *BEST BET*
This course is an introduction to web design and development within an overview of current web environments. Projects will cover planning and implementation of websites that offer common functionality as well as adhere to good usability, accessibility, compatibility, and validation practices. HTML, XHTML, CSS, interactivity, information architecture and navigational structures will be explored, as well as usability and web design strategies.
Open to: All university undergraduate degree students; except Communication Design and Design & Technology majors.
PSAM 1050 Credits: 3
Photo Practices
This course provides an overview to photography as a visual language. Students are introduced to fundamental techniques in photography focusing on digital processes. Students learn and explore the methods and aesthetics of photographic images through a variety of assignments, readings, field trips and lectures. This hands-on technical course provides students with an understanding of digital capture, editing, and output utilizing current equipment and software. Students are encouraged to experiment with different modes of photography and to create a final project based on individual interests.
Open to: All School of Art, Media, and Technology undergraduate degree students; except Photography majors.
PSAM 1050 Credits: 3
Photo Practices *BEST BET*
This course provides an overview to photography as a visual language. Students are introduced to fundamental techniques in photography focusing on digital processes. Students learn and explore the methods and aesthetics of photographic images through a variety of assignments, readings, field trips and lectures. This hands-on technical course provides students with an understanding of digital capture, editing, and output utilizing current equipment and software. Students are encouraged to experiment with different modes of photography and to create a final project based on individual interests.
Open to: All School of Art, Media, and Technology undergraduate degree students; except Photography majors.
PSAM 1070 Credits: 3
Typography and Visual Design
This intensive course introduces non-majors to the fundamentals of communication design: the history, form, and use of type and image. Through a variety of projects, students explore the relationship between ideas, language, form, and communication as aspects of design processes, from conceptualizing to execution, and design thinking.
Open to: All university undergraduate degree students; except Communication Design and Design & Technology majors.
PSAM 1073 Credits: 3
Sculpture
The aim of this course is to provide a broad overview of contemporary 3D practice by introducing the conceptual and practical tools necessary to make sculpture today. This is done through the exploration of various aspects of the medium, historic references and technical methodologies necessary to realize works of art in a variety of materials including wood, metal, clay and plaster. By the end of this course students will be able to challenge historical assumptions of sculpture and develop their own personal 3D aesthetic.
Open to: All university undergraduate degree students; except Fine Arts majors.
PSAM 1075 Credits: 3
Painting *BEST BET*
This course focuses on the basics of painting, with an emphasis on technical paint handling, color, composition and materials. Acquiring basic studio habits and practices, students begin the process of a visual and conceptual examination of painting today. Individual and group criticism, combined with field trips and discussion, expands perspectives within historical contexts. As students advance, they explore a variety of abstract and figurative possibilities for self-examination.
Open to: All university undergraduate degree students.
PSAM 1080 Credits: 3
Digital Imaging
This course provides hands-on skills and processes for digital image production in both print and online environments. Students will learn design specific technologies for digital printing, including vector and bitmap imaging, desktop publishing, media integration and color management. In-class projects will be complimented by a final portfolio of work. Primary software used: Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign.
Open to: All university undergraduate degree students; except Communication Design, Design & Technology, and Photography majors.
PSAM 1900 Credits: 0
Open Drawing Workshop
This is a four hour session of open drawing featuring live models. Drop in and have available models at your convenience so that you may hone your drawing skills or make up assignments as needed. Open to the public in the second time slot.
PSAM 2501 Credits: 3
Introduction to Printmaking
This course is designed to give students a first exposure to the studio and to the exploration of printmaking. Through personal instruction and demonstrations, students will learn a range of printmaking methods and approaches to making visual work through these methods. Students will make a range of original prints and will be prepared for entering into further study in printmaking. In Section A, students will learn how to use woodcut tools and the print by hand method, apply a hard ground to a zinc plate and etch it and draw and produce a lithograph. In Section B, students will learn how to produce a screenprint, make an etching, and work in lithography. Students will visit local museums and/or printmaking studios to learn more about the mediums in which they're working. The class is open to beginning and advanced students. [Formerly offered under PUPR 2200.]
Open to: All university undergraduate degree students. Graduate degree students may audit.
PSAM 2510 Credits: 3
Etching
In this Printmaking class students will learn three basic techniques of etching a zinc plate: hard ground, soft ground, and aquatint as well as how to print with consistency and controlled variation. The objective for both beginning and advanced students is to provide a vocabulary of techniques to free students to explore the infinite possibilities of expression, from a three-dimensional textured surface to a flat minimal approach. There will be demonstrations in roll-up viscosity, Chine-coll? and color printing. There will be a visit by either an artist or professional etcher. The class is open to beginning and advanced students.
Open to: All university undergraduate degree students. Graduate degree students may audit.
PSAM 2511 Credits: 3
Photo Etching
In this Printmaking course, students will learn to use photographic processes to make etched plates for printing. Photographic and photo mechanical reproduction technologies are constantly evolving andin this class students ill work with a range of techniques, from "low tech" to digital high tech alternatives to plate-making practices. All of these enable the full expression of ideas and concepts which incorporate photographic images. This class is open to beginning and advanced students. Some experience in etching is helpful. [Formerly offered under PUPR 2211.]
Open to: All university undergraduate degree students; graduate degree students may audit.
PSAM 2520 Credits: 3
Screenprint
Screenprinting utilizes a wide range of imaging techniques, from handmade and photographic images to abstract visual forms and can be printed on many different surfaces. In this Printmaking course students learn to work with reduction printing, hand painted acetate stencils, cut stencils, and digititally generated images for screenprinting, as well as learning to mix inks and use a range of printing and registering techniques. The materials used are water soluble and non-toxic. Techniques learned in this class are applicable to projects in all major studio areas. The class is open to beginning and advanced students. [Formerly offered under PUPR 2220.]
Open to: All university undergraduate degree students. Graduate degree students may audit.
PSAM 2521 Credits: 3
Screenprint: Digital
This Printmaking class is designed as an introductory and experimental print lab combining a hands-on approach to screenprint with digital image creation. Beginning projects will establish a foundation in the fundamentals of screenprint, then move on to the development of prints incorporating digital tools. Final projects will focus on the students' creative ideas rendered through their work across screenprint and digital technologies. [Formerly offered under PUPR 2221.]
Open to: All university undergraduate degree students. Graduate degree students may audit.
PSAM 2524 Credits: 3
Screenprint: Fashion
This Printmaking course opens up opportunities for students to research, design and screenprint fashion apparel, textiles, and to incorporate printing as a component in planning interdisciplinary projects. Students use digital printing techniques to print motifs on their fashion designs and embellish articles of clothing (T-shirts, scarves, canvas bags, etc.) and work in a group setting to expand the options of color imagery on different materials with a water-based color system. This course is appropriate for all students who want to pursue the exciting art of screenprinting and learn an understanding of how it works as a medium for both art and adornment for functional items. Beginning screenprinters are welcome.
Open to: All university undergraduate degree students. Graduate degree students may audit.
PSAM 2530 Credits: 3
Lithography
This Printmaking course introduces the student to all forms of hand lithography: crayon and pencil; tusche washes, transfers, photo, stone engraving, and mezzotints. Use of replicate images to produce a traditional edition or suite of unique prints is undertaken to further each student's own interests and ideas. Students receive individual attention and suggestions for furthering their work. The class is open to beginning and advanced students.
Open to: All university undergraduate degree students. Graduate degree students may audit.
PSAM 2543 Credits: 3
Relief Printmaking: Integrated
This course provides a hands-on experience in woodcut, linoleum cut, and type-setting for beginning and intermediate printmaking students. It introduces the techniques and the applications of relief printmaking. Students carve wood and linoleum blocks from which they print color images. These images can be combined with lead and wooden type and printed on an automated letterpress. Using woodcut, linoleum cut and typesetting, this class will explore printmaking, book arts, and letterpress principles and process. It is structured so that ideas and demonstrations will be applied to group and individual assignments.
Open to: All university undergraduate degree students. Graduate degree students may audit.
PSAM 2550 Credits: 3
Artist's Books: Introduction
In this Printmaking course, students will learn the craft and conceptual foundations of bookbinding and artists' books. The course begins with an introduction to materials, form, binding and printing techniques, as well as conversations about and explorations of the book as an art form. Throughout the semester, students will bind several sample books, set type for letterpress printing, experiment with a range of techniques for getting images and text into artist books, look at and discuss contemporary artist books and practices, and begin to develop their visual work in the artist book form. The final project in the class will be an independent book project in which students synthesize their knowledge of materials and form with the development of a conceptual book idea. This course will also have some readings and visits to see artists' books collections.
Open to: All university undergraduate degree students. Graduate degree students may audit.
PSAM 2565 Credits: 3
Letterpress: Hand-Set Type
In this Printmaking course, students interested in design and/or fine arts will learn the basics of letterpress printing using lead and wood type. The course will focus on setting type, visual design on the press, printing on the Vandercook Proofing Press, and developing a thorough knowledge of letterpress through experimentation and practice. Students will work in groups to respond to three visual design challenges over the course of the semester. For the final project, each student will create and execute a printed work that builds on the skills and ideas developed in class.
Open to: All university undergraduate degree students, freshman and sophomores only.
UENV 2000 Credits: 4
Environment and Society *BEST BET*
The state of the air, water, and soil climate change, habitat conversion, invasive species, biodiversity decline, deforestation, overfishing, and many other environmental issues are at the core of most of our pressing economic, social, political and human health concerns. This course examines the roots of the modern environmental crisis, reviewing the most current environmental issues and the underlying science for a critical look at how societies have interacted with the natural environment past and present and requirements for a sustainable future. The course consists of small group discussions, readings and case studies.
This course is open to all bachelor level students at the university.
UENV 2400 Credits: 4
Urban Ecology
Students learn the fundamental ecological principles starting with core concepts in evolution then building from species and populations to community dynamics and structure, the study of ecosystems, and finally landscape ecology. The course also introduces the drivers of biodiversity, the importance of genetic diversity, and the impacts of climate change on species and communities. This course is positioned to justify the statement that understanding ecology (how biological organisms interact with each other and their environment) is crucial to understanding how to move toward a more sustainable future.
This course is open to all bachelor level students at the university.
UGLB 2110 Credits: 3
[Dis]Order & [In]Justice
"This class serves as an introduction to Global Studies. The focus is on the tension between order and justice as it plays out across the contemporary world, from war to migration, to the changing roles of the state, international institutions, transnational actors, and citizens. A governing metaphor for the class is the "border" and the ways in which it creates order and disorder in the modern system of states. We will examine the creation of the borders of countries, but also the borders between the local and the global, the legal and illegal, the licit and the illicit, self and other. These borders have intertwined histories, structures, and logic that we shall explore together. In particular we will seek to understand order as a dynamic relationship between territory, identity and belonging, and justice as a question of responsibility and ethics at the collective and personal level in an intimate relationship to forms of order. In other words, how did we get to where we are today, and what shouldùand canùwe do about it? We will explore these topics through ""global"" perspective with an interdisciplinary focus, emphasizing the interconnectedness between global and local spaces and the impact of global issues on the real human lives that are inevitably at the center of our investigations.
This course is open to all bachelor level students at the university.
"
UGLB 2111 Credits: 3
Global Economies
This class explores the circulation of money, goods, bodies, and ideas that make up the global economy as it is experienced and lived today. This core course introduces students to key global areas where economic dynamics intersects with politics, society, and culture. It explores essential and contested concepts such as value, money, labor, trade, and debt, "licit" and "illicit" economies, and moral economy. We will examine changing trends in the global political economy as well as emerging areas such as the sharing economy (e.g. AirBnB) or technologies such as automated trading. Readings will be drawn from classic texts, contemporary commentary, and case studies from a variety of disciplines that seek to understand the "economic" and relate its logics and workings to our contemporary realities of unparalleled inequality, interconnectivity, and interdependence.
ULEC 2510 Credits: 0
Introduction to Feminist Thought & Action
(Disc. Sec Reqd)
Feminism is not a single-voiced, coherent body of doctrine but rather a proliferation of thinking and actions in response to what seems to be the near-universal fact of women's subordination, past and present, in societies which arrange gender relations in a wide variety of ways. Feminism's lack of unity as a movement has been a strength and a weakness, and organized resistance to sexism has come and gone. Right now, in both the United States and internationally, we are living in a time of renewed critical self-consciousness about gender. This course is a sampler of key debates and actions to give a sense of the variety of feminisms that have evolved in the last 40 years. It will track both the growth of feminist movements and their confrontations with backlash. We will discuss readings on reproduction, the gendering of work, theoretical takes on "the death of feminism," the variety of feminisms in different parts of the world, the meaning (and strengths and weaknesses) of the "identity politics" of race and gender, recent discussions of "the body," including discussions of queer theory and trans experience. Visiting speakers and films.
Students must register for both the lecture and discussion section of this course.
ULEC 2511 Credits: 3
Intro to Feminist Thought: DSC
This is the required discussion section for ULEC 2160 (the required lecture for Introduction to Feminist Thought & Action). Please refer to the course description for the lecture.
Students must register for both the lecture and discussion section of this course.
ULEC 2640 Credits: 0
The Old Weird America: Music as Democratic Speech from the Commonplace: Song to Bob Dylan
(Disc. Sec Reqd) *BEST BET*
Throughout American history people excluded from or ignored by the traditional narrative of the country have seized on music as a means of both affirming and questioning individual and cultural existence. Music has been used to make ecstatic, despairing, and symbolic statements about the nature of America and about life itself. These are big words for ordinary, anonymous songs like "The Cuckoo Bird" or "John Henry."ùbut it is in songs that seem to have emerged out of nowhere, and in songs that as self-conscious works of art are made to reclaim that nowhere, where much of the country's story bides its time. This course examines "commonplace" or authorless songs as elemental, founding documents of American identity. These authorless songs can be examined as a form of speech that is always in flux, especially in the work of Bob Dylan across the last fifty years. Course material includes film excerpts and recordings from the 1920s to the present, as well as Colson Whitehead's 2001 novel John Henry Days, the 19th century blackface plays of Thomas "Daddy" Rice and Sarah Silverman's 2007 blackface comedy "Face Wars," Luc Sante's essay "The Invention of the Blues" from the collection The Rose & the Briar: Death, Love and Liberty in the American Ballad, Bob Dylan's Chronicles, Volume 1, and much more.
Students must register for both the lecture and discussion section of this course.
ULEC 2641 Credits: 3
Old Weird America: Discussion *BEST BET*
This is the required discussion section for ULEC 2640 (the required lecture for Old Weird America). Please refer to the course description for the lecture.
Students must register for both the lecture and discussion section of this course.
XINS 1001 Credits: 1
Beginning Piano Class
This course is designed for the beginning piano student with a general knowledge of music reading and notation. Students will learn scales, arpeggios, chords and inversions, and explore beginning level repertoire. Individual progress is monitored by the professor, and repertoire and exercises appropriate to each student are assigned. Course meets in a digital piano lab. Note: In order to complete homework assignments, students should have access to a piano or keyboard.
XINS 1001 Credits: 1
Beginning Piano Class *BEST BET*
This course is designed for the beginning piano student with a general knowledge of music reading and notation. Students will learn scales, arpeggios, chords and inversions, and explore beginning level repertoire. Individual progress is monitored by the professor, and repertoire and exercises appropriate to each student are assigned. Course meets in a digital piano lab. Note: In order to complete homework assignments, students should have access to a piano or keyboard.
XINS 1003 Credits: 1
Piano for Non-Majors *BEST BET*
Geared toward the enthusiastic first-timer, Piano for Non-majors will explore the keyboard layout, basic finger technique, hand coordination, and fundamentals of music notation. In addition, learning basic music theory principles will enable the students to play simple tunes by ear. Enjoy some of your favorite classical, folk, and popular repertoire individually and as part of a piano ensemble! Course meets in a digital piano lab. This course is geared toward students who do not have music reading ability. Students who can read music should enroll in Beginning Piano. Note: In order to complete homework assignments, students should have access to a piano or keyboard.
XINS 1010 Credits: 1
Piano Class 1
A continuation of Beginning Piano Class. Students continue work on scales, arpeggios, chords/inversions, and repertoire appropriate to their playing level. Pre-requisite: XINS1001 or XINS1003, or by placement exam. Placement exams are held prior to the start of each semester. Contact the Extension Office at mannesextension@newschool.edu or 212.580.0210 x4802 for placement exam scheduling. Course meets in a digital piano lab. Note: In order to complete homework assignments, students should have access to a piano or keyboard.
XINS 1015 Credits: 1
Piano Class 2
A continuation of Piano Class 1. Students continue work on scales, arpeggios, chords/inversions, and repertoire appropriate to their playing level. Pre-requisite: XINS1010, or by placement exam. Placement exams are held prior to the start of each semester. Contact the Extension Office at mannesextension@newschool.edu or 212.580.0210 x4802 for placement exam scheduling. Course meets in a digital piano lab. Note: In order to complete homework assignments, students should have access to a piano or keyboard.
XINS 1101 Credits: 1
Introduction to Conducting for Non-Majors
"Conducting is one of the most exciting of all musical activities. It is also paradoxical; learning to conduct provides the deepest possible understanding of music, and yet the conductor is the one musician onstage who makes no sound. It is concrete: we have a huge effect on how the music sounds. It is also ephemeral: we are drawing lines in the air. This course will introduce you to some of the basic concepts of this art which remains mysterious to many. Using the class as an ensemble, you will gain practical experience putting these concepts to use, for the only true way to understand conducting is by doing it. Also, this experience will prepare you for further work in the field if you so desire. This course will introduce basic concepts of conducting, score analysis, manual technique, and rehearsal strategies. Music will be drawn from the core symphonic and operatic repertoire. We will also discuss methods of conducting 20th century contemporary music. This course is a natural companion to ""Intro to Score Reading"" (XINS 1110); however each may be taken separately as a stand-alone course."
XPER 1001 Credits: 1
Community Orchestra *BEST BET*
Open to all community members, faculty, staff, and students at Mannes or any division of The New School. The Community Orchestra is a performance based ensemble, and has space for all orchestral instruments. If interested, please email MannesExtension@newschool.edu with your name and instrument. The Orchestra rehearses Wednesdays from 7:30-10:00 p.m. (Fall and Spring Semesters only) in the concert hall on the second floor of Mannes College The New School for Music (150 West 85th Street). At Mannes College, 150 W. 85th St, 212.580.0210 x4802, mannesextension@newschool.edu
XPER 1007 Credits: 1
Guitar Ensemble *BEST BET*
The purpose of this course is to explore the techniques of classical guitar, as well as the practice of good musicianship û rhythmic accuracy, tone production, sight reading, and phrasing û through ensemble performance. During class we will read through pieces of a wide variety of periods, focusing on stylistically appropriate performance practices and stopping, as lead by the demands of the material, to examine relevant technical issues, for example û left hand slurs, barring positions, arpeggio and scale techniques. Students must have a usable guitar (nylon preferred) and have moderate (through 5th position) sight reading facility.
XPER 1009 Credits: 1
Flute Ensemble
Intermediate through professional level flutists-Undergraduate, Graduate, non-matriculated adults and Extension Diploma students-will explore the extensive piccolo, C flute, alto and bass flute repertoire of all styles and periods in a relaxed, supportive environment. No audition is necessary, just a love of the flute family and the vast array of pieces composed and arranged for this extremely popular combination. Participants are encouraged to suggest pieces they have heard and would like to play with a group. Each class will begin with warm-up selections. The first few weeks will cover possible repertoire for the semester based on the group size, level and musical preferences. Players will learn to use the flute to conduct entrances, phrasing and cut offs. Group tuning will be a focus. Once trios, quartets, etc. and complete group pieces with piano and multi-media possibilities are chosen, semester rehearsals will work toward an end of semester concert for family, friends and the community. Community outreach programs may also be arranged.
XPER 1012 Credits: 1
Introduction to the Alexander Technique
This course is a performance-oriented class for people who must use their bodies effectively: musicians, actors, and dancers. The scope of the course lies beyond the release of tension or the re-education of muscular movement, for it improves people's use of themselves in their daily activities. A more efficient coordination is achieved through a dynamic balance of the head, neck, and back, which becomes integral to sitting, standing, walking, bending, and performing. Proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking English is needed for this small group experiential learning course, which involves movement, performance, observation of self and others, hands on guidance from the instructor, verbal processing and discussion.
XPER 1500 Credits: 1
The New School Chorus *BEST BET*
The New School Chorus is an exciting new ensemble, open to members from the entire New School and greater NYC community, to foster both joyful communal singing and a chance to explore a whole range of music and singing styles from the world community at large. With everything from Western choral masterpieces to Eastern European folk singing, classic American jazz and popular song to traditional music from cultures across the globe, the rehearsal experience will be about integrating both written works and music learned-by-ear with a fun and educational approach to exploring the myriad sonic possibilities of the human voice. The chorus will engage with the school and city community as much as possible in performances and opportunities for outreach throughout the year.
XTOM 0010 Credits: 2
Basic Theory *BEST BET*
This course will explore the basic fundamentals of music theory in preparation for more advanced coursework, a kind of "bootcamp" for the rest of the theory sequence. The goal is to achieve an understanding and fluency in the standard music theory terminology and concepts including key signatures, major and minor scales, triads, and seventh chords. "Fundamentals of Music Theory" by L. Poundie Burstein (available in the Extension Office for $15) is required to complete twice - weekly homework assignments. Course requirements/pre-requisites: basic ability to read pitches in treble and bass clefs; students not meeting these requirements should enroll in XTOM0001 or XTOM0002.
XTOM 0103 Credits: 1
Basic Dictation *BEST BET*
A companion course to Basic Ear Training, Basic Dictation is designed to prepare students to write down simple melodies. The course starts with recognizing intervals and short melodic rhythmic and melodic patterns. By the end of the semester, students will be notating short melodies in one key, and will be ready for Dictation 1.
XTOM 0105 Credits: 1
Basic Ear Training *BEST BET*
A course designed to teach beginning skills in sight singing. Students work on singing major and minor scales, intervals, and simple melodies using solfege syllables. Rhythmic patterns are also learned, along with basic conducting skills. This course prepares the student for Ear Training 1A. Pre-requisite: basic ability to read music in treble and bass clefs.
XTOM 1001 Credits: 2
Theory 1 *BEST BET*
This course explores the simple procedures of tonal music in two areas: counterpoint and harmony. Students learn to analyze and write harmonic progressions, set melodies and complete figured bass using triads and seventh chords and their inversions. Rules of of two-part counterpoint writing in first, second, and third species are covered. Pre-requisite: XTOM0010 or by placement exam. Placement exams are held prior to the start of each semester. Contact the Extension Office at mannesextension@newschool.edu or 212.580.0210 x4802 for placement exam scheduling.
XTOM 1101 Credits: 1
Ear Training 1 *BEST BET*
This course is comprised of learning to sight-sing of simple melodies using solfege syllables in treble and bass clefs, as well as basic rhythmic exercises. Pre-requisite: XTOM0105 or by placement exam. Placement exams are held prior to the start of each semester. Contact the Extension Office at mannesextension@newschool.edu or 212.580.0210 x4802 for placement exam scheduling.
XTOM 1201 Credits: 1
Dictation 1 *BEST BET*
This course explores simple melodic dictation in one voice. By the end of the course, students will be able to recognize and transcribe intervals, transcribe common rhythmic patterns in several meters, and transcribe simple melodies. Pre-requisite: XTOM0103 or by placement exam. Placement exams are held prior to the start of each semester. Contact the Extension Office at mannesextension@newschool.edu or 212.580.0210 x4802 for placement exam scheduling.
XVCO 1001 Credits: 1
Beginning Voice Class *BEST BET*
The major objective of this class is the development of the solo voice. Emphasis is on understanding and mastering the fundamentals of effective voice production. Individually assigned solo material, group preparation of songs, warm-ups, and vocalise material is required. Course is appropriate not only for beginning singers, but also for those working with voices such as choral conductors and accompanists.
XVCO 1038 Credits: 1
Theatrical Repertory for the Solo Voice *BEST BET*
This course provides an introduction to learning arias and solos from a wide variety of repertory, including opera, musical theater, Zarzuela, Gilbert & Sullivan, and operetta. Our emphasis is on both the musical and dramatic preparation of songs and arias, and, if possible, ensembles from a wide variety of musical literature. Students are given techniques to understand the composer's musical intentions and will begin basic preparatory study of singing in various styles and languages.
XVCO 1202 Credits: 1
Building Your Music Theater Songbook for the Industry *BEST BET*
This course teaches the student how to research, choose, and prepare audition material from the American Musical Theater genre including a survey of styles ranging from standards, traditional, up to contemporary and pop/rock. Students prepare a minimum of one song per week. Representative composers from each style period will be studied, along with vocal and character typing techniques. Audition techniques will be discussed including how to enter an audition room, how to address a panel, how to talk to an accompanist, and how to exit the audition room.


Back to Top

 
The New School The New School Divisions Milano The New School for Management and Urban Policy The New School for General Studies The New School for Social Research Milano The New School for Management and Urban Policy Parsons The New School for Design Eugene Lang College The New School for Liberal Arts Mannes College The New School for Music The New School for Drama The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music Mannes College The New School for Music
Copyright © 2014 The New School