Fall 2014 Course Schedule


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      LCST 2120 A   Introduction to Cultural Studies  (CRN:5146) *BEST BET* 3 CR Rault , Jasmine   TR - 8:30 am to 9:45 am
  • *Intro to Cultural Studies* [Tracks C & M] This course examines the pivotal role of culture in the modern world, including the ideas, values, artifacts, and practices of people in their collective lives. Cultural Studies focuses on the importance of studying the material processes through which culture is constructed. It highlights process over product and rupture over continuity. In particular, it presents culture as a dynamic arena of social struggle and utopian possibility. Students read key thinkers and examine critical frameworks from a historical and a theoretical approach, such as Raymond Williams, Stuart Hall and the Birmingham School; the work on popular culture, identity politics, and postmodernism in America; and the emergence of a 'global cultural studies' in which transnational cultural flows are examined and assessed. Class sessions are set up as dialogic encounters between cultural theory and concrete analysis. [Tracks C & M]
    •   LCST 2129 A   "The Girl" as Media  (CRN:7541) 4 CR Wark , Kenneth   TR - 1:50 pm to 3:30 pm
    • "*""The Girl"" as Media Image* [Tracks M & C] She is everywhere: selling everything from magazines to real estate. The Girl now mediates our relationship to commodities, and even to each other. Feminist theory has argued that these images are not those of ""real women,"" but has had less to say about how ""she"" has become a structural necessity for marketing. This course examines both these aspectsùgender and commodity. It examines popular culture (Beyonce) and theories of gender, but also writers and artists who have dissented from this figure, from Kathy Acker to Beatriz Preciado. It also considers men who have appropriated and channeled her, from Warhol's transgender superstars to Almodovar's Hollywood drag. This course links theories of the commodity, gender, and sexuality and applies them to contemporary everyday experience. [Tracks M & C]"
      •   LCST 3411 A   Trans(gender) Cultural Studies  (CRN:7515) 4 CR Cowan , Theresa   MW - 1:50 pm to 3:30 pm
      • *Trans(gender) Cultural Studies: Theory, Activism and Cultural Production* [Track C] Transgender Cultural Studies will provide students with an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Trans- Studies, through an exploration of key theoretical texts, activist histories and archives and a wide range of expressive cultures including film and video, performance, spoken-word, memoir, blogging and other "new media." This course will consider the ways in which Trans- Studies draws from and builds upon queer and feminist, critical race and anti-colonial theory, but also aims to study the ways that the unique histories and politics of transgender and transsexual people have been obscured within these broader fields. Furthermore, the course will be framed by a consideration of the ways that we might "critically trans-" cultural studies: that is, what does Trans- Studies bring to Cultural Studies? Shifting from a focus on identity politics to a practice of assemblage and allied critique, this seminar will take up the work of theorists, cultural producers and activists including Laverne Cox, Janet Mock, Susan Stryker, Kate Bornstein, Jay Prosser, Sandy Stone, Dean Spade, Patrick Califia-Rice, Bobby Noble, Imogen Binnie, Viviane Namaste, Trish Salah, Eli Clare, Justin Vivian Bond, Mira Soleil Ross, the Fully Functional Cabaret, Mangos with Chili, Viva Ruiz, Emi Koyama, Katastrophe and Nina Arsenault. [Track C]
        •   LCST 3871 A   The Confession - Theory and Practice  (CRN:7539) 3 CR Rangan , Pooja   R - 9:00 am to 11:40 am
        • *The Confession: Theory and Practice* [Tracks C & M] Michel Foucault's 1980 pronouncement that "Western man has become a confessing animal" would seem prophetically descriptive of 21st century existence, where daily life is thoroughly permeated by testimonial forms (television talk shows, YouTube videos, tweeting, Facebook updates). Indeed, we might say that confession is the preeminent technology of the postmodern self, so much so that our very sense of being seems inseparable from such perpetual declarations of selfhood. This course aims to situate the philosophical and political implications of the confession by engaging its rhetorical form and the genealogies of its contemporary mediated contexts (from religion to justice, medicine, education, family, community, and other intimate socialities). In particular, we will engage the performative structure of the confession, investigating how the confessional speech-act enacts and recalibrates the relationship between visible and invisible, knowledge and uncertainty, self and other, public and private, freedom and control. Readings include: Augustine, Rousseau, Sade, Freud, Foucault, Levinas, Nancy, Paul Rabinow, Sara Ahmed, Saba Mahmood, Didier Fassin. Topics include: human rights/asylum testimonies, reality TV, coming-out narratives, religion and piety, psychoanalysis, criminality and conviction, pornography. [Tracks C & M] At least 2 intro courses (or at least 1 intro course and one 2000-level course). /One intro course should be in the relevant Track M - Or by permission of instructor.
          Prerequisite(s): At least 2 intro courses (or at least 1 intro course and one 2000-level course). /One intro course should be in the relevant Track M - Or by permission of instructor.
          •   LCST 4029 A   Foucault, Bodies, Power  (CRN:5879) 4 CR Rault , Jasmine   TR - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
          • *Foucault, Bodies, Power* [Track C] This course provides a thick introduction to the work of Michel Foucault and the key concepts that have helped to shape the field of cultural studies. We will explore Foucault's theories of discipline, the body, discourse, power, biopolitics and sexuality and how these theories have been used, challenged and redefined within feminist, queer, critical race, crip, post-colonial and decolonial cultural studies. [Track C] At least 2 intro courses, at least one "toolkit" or 2000-level methods course, and at least two 3000-level courses. One Intro course should be in the relevant Track C. ---Or by permission of instructor
            Prerequisite(s): At least 2 intro courses, at least one "toolkit" or 2000-level methods course, and at least two 3000-level courses. One Intro course should be in the relevant Track C. ---Or by permission of instructor
            •   LCST 4032 AX   Queering Activism  (CRN:7186) 4 CR Rault , Jasmine   R - 12:10 pm to 2:50 pm
            • *Queering Activism: Making Creative Resistance* [Track C] The forms of "activism" that this course explores range from the collective acts, organizing movements, strategies and tactics to individual gestures and accidents, life-sustaining if ephemeral social lives and scenes, to the images, sounds and sometimes words that make up an archive and ongoing repertoire of queer creative resistance. Given this city's rich history of activism at the intersections of sexual, racial, religious, national and class politics, we will begin by focusing on organizations, events and scenes in New York City and use this background to consider the forms of activism that hold sway in other national and international contexts. Working with the understanding that 'queer activism' is not necessarily or most importantly dedicated to sexuality, we will pursue questions such as, What does it mean (and what has it meant) to queer activism? What are the historical and contemporary relationships between 'queer' and 'activism'? How have queer creative cultures contributed to activism? What can we learn about contemporary modes of activism by studying queer traces in archival collections? This course will involve several 'field trips' to archives, organizations and events to provide students with an understanding of the broad range of queer activisms necessitated by this city (and country) as well as a sense of how and where to grow this understanding through archival research. Finally, students will be expected to develop (collectively or individually) their own forms of queer creative resistance as a component of their final grade. [Track C] At least 2 intro courses, at least one "toolkit" or 2000-level methods course, and at least two 3000-level courses. One Intro course should be in the relevant Tracks C. ---Or by permission of instructor
              Prerequisite(s): At least 2 intro courses, at least one "toolkit" or 2000-level methods course, and at least two 3000-level courses. One Intro course should be in the relevant Tracks C. ---Or by permission of instructor
              •   LFYW 1000 F   Writing the Essay I: The Future of Feminist Theory  (CRN:5161) *BEST BET* 4 CR Kruse , Meridith   TR - 11:55 am to 1:35 pm
              • This writing intensive course will look at how several innovative scholars are envisioning the future of feminist theory. Rather than presume to know what feminist theory entails, we will develop a working definition of the field from our engagement with course texts. As a result, no prior knowledge of feminist theory is required, but students will be expected to demonstrate a willingness to listen to challenging texts and new ideas. Class discussions will explore strategies for transforming current inequities into a more just future, and consider how feminist theory can contribute to this kind of radical social change in the world. Students will have an opportunity to use the ideas, concepts, and practices introduced in course to think through a contemporary topic of their choosing.
                •   LFYW 1000 O   Writing the Essay I: The Future of Feminist Theory  (CRN:2130) 4 CR Kruse , Meridith   TR - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
                • This writing intensive course will look at how several innovative scholars are envisioning the future of feminist theory. Rather than presume to know what feminist theory entails, we will develop a working definition of the field from our engagement with course texts. As a result, no prior knowledge of feminist theory is required, but students will be expected to demonstrate a willingness to listen to challenging texts and new ideas. Class discussions will explore strategies for transforming current inequities into a more just future, and consider how feminist theory can contribute to this kind of radical social change in the world. Students will have an opportunity to use the ideas, concepts, and practices introduced in course to think through a contemporary topic of their choosing.
                  •   LHIS 2221 A   Power and Biology: The Global South and the History of Science  (CRN:5866) 4 CR Palermo , Laura   MW - 1:50 pm to 3:30 pm
                  • This seminar approaches the history of science from the perspective of the global margins. We will study the contextual connections between biological research, imperialism and postcolonial societies. We will analyze case studies from the history of Eugenics and racism, military research, sexually transmitted diseases and the social and environmental impact of science in the Global South. The course places special emphasis on historical case studies from Latin America and Africa.
                    •   LHIS 4500 A   Gender, Politics and History  (CRN:7200) 3 CR Abelson , Elaine   T - 4:00 pm to 5:50 pm
                    • This seminar explores aspects of women's history and the history of gender in the United States over the past two centuries. The course stresses the themes of difference among women and between women and men as a means of examining the social construction of gender and the logic of feminist analysis and activity. Students discuss the major themes in gender history, develop critical and analytical skills, and appreciate current and on-going theoretical (and controversial) debates. The course analyzes key conceptual and methodological frameworks as gender, class, sexuality, power, and race. Thematically organized, readings include both primary and secondary material. Students complete two papers and participate in student-led discussions. Cross-listed with New School for Social Research.
                      Open to juniors and seniors only.
                      •   LLST 3503 A   Milton's Paradise Lost  (CRN:7335) *BEST BET* 4 CR Savory , Elaine   TR - 1:50 pm to 3:30 pm
                      • This great epic is full of action, vividly imagined scenes and of course, excellent poetry. We shall read the whole work aloud, book by book, because Milton was blind when he composed it orally,(those who attended him wrote it down. We shall explore the poem formally and in terms of its ideas and stories. We shall also place it in the context of Milton's life, times and other works, as well as the Bible, and we shall consider some important criticism of the poem. Students familiar with poetry and new to it are both equally welcome.
                        •   LNGC 1407 A   Race, Gender, Cultural Politics: Reading bell hooks  (CRN:7355) 4 CR Cowan , Theresa   MW - 11:55 am to 1:35 pm
                        • In this course we will follow the critical interventions of bell hooks and her contributions to women-of-color feminism, and will work towards what hooks calls "education as the practice of freedom." We will read selections from hooks' significant body of theory and criticism, and study the cultural texts that she takes up as well as the writing of other scholars and critics who have also responded to these cultural texts. As we look at representational politics through hooks' interdisciplinary prism, students can expect to encounter a wide range of media including film, music videos, news coverage, and literature. This course offers students the opportunity to engage deeply with foundational texts in critical race studies, feminist theory, education studies, and class-based analysis; and, taking our lead from hooks, the class itself will be a site of inquiry and transformational political action.
                          •   LREL 2070 A   Hebrew Bible as Literature  (CRN:2689) 4 CR Snyder , Fran   MW - 11:55 am to 1:35 pm
                          • The Hebrew Bible is an anthology of literatures, a historical digest, ethical law collection, and a record of one people's experience of their deity. Class readings emphasize literary genres: the myths of Genesis, narratives of slavery and liberation, the Joseph novella, the political epic of Samuel and Kings, the Book of Ruth as a short story, and Esther as an attempted genocide tempered by farce. Students explore the Bible's methods of characterization and elliptical storytelling techniques. Biblical concepts ûmonotheism, human failure and redemption, creationû are grounded by scholarship in ancient near eastern history and also examined from contemporary perspectives: the prophet Jeremiah in light of 9/11 and other familiar destructions; and Mother Eve and biblical daughters through feminist and gender analysis. Special consideration is given to the influence of Women's and Gender Studies on biblical scholarship. All texts are in English.
                            •   LREL 2804 A   Ritual and the Body  (CRN:7350) 4 CR Farneth , Molly   TR - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
                            • This course explores one of the central aspects of religion: ritual. We will consider the role of rituals in structuring the lives of individuals and communities, both as a means of expressing beliefs and values and as a means of training the body to develop certain habits and dispositions. We will also see how rituals shape, and are shaped by, local gender roles û how they perform, perpetuate, and transform what it means to be gendered in a variety of communities. Readings include anthropological, sociological, and philosophical accounts of ritual, and will be supplemented by the concrete examples of ritual introduced by site visits and observations, film, and students' own experiences.
                              •   LREL 3068 A   Buddhism and Gender  (CRN:7180) *BEST BET* 4 CR Smith , Laura   MW - 3:50 pm to 5:30 pm
                              • This course explores the role of gender in Buddhist practice and doctrine. How do sex and gender shape women and men's access to Buddhist teachings, experiences, and worldviews? Students look at the complex and potentially problematic relationships between Buddhist philosophy and Buddhist institutions, taking into account a broad spectrum of perspectives, both historical and contemporary. Engaging the work of scholars, visionaries, artists, monks and nuns, the class engages written and visual materials from India, China, Japan, Tibet, and the West. All materials will be in English. There are no language or other prerequisites. This course is in conjunction with the Rubin Museum of Art and will include several class sessions on the gallery floors.
                                •   LSCI 2040 A   Genes, Environment & Behavior  (CRN:3325) 4 CR Chamany , Katayoun   MW - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
                                • This course uses a critical pedagogy to challenge the normative assumptions made about the dynamic relationship between our genetic make up and our environments and explore the field of epigenetics. Course sessions and assignments will retrace the experiments that led to the discovery of genes and their inheritance patterns, review molecular analyses to understand the functional products of genes, and reveal how the acquisition and accumulation of mutations and sex lead to diverse human behaviors that can be influenced by environmental factors in changing social environments. Course readings include newspaper articles, secondary scientific literature, and a textbook, while videos and CD-ROMS depicting molecular DNA techniques and their automation will clarify the more technical aspects of the course. Prerequisite for all biology intermediate level courses, satisfies the Foundation requirement for the Interdisciplinary Science major, satisfies the elective for Psychology, satisfies the elective for the Gender Studies Minor, and is offered every fall.
                                  •   LSOC 2053 A   Sex, Gender & Sexuality in Soc  (CRN:7406) *BEST BET* 4 CR Ziff , Elizabeth   TR - 8:00 am to 9:40 am
                                  • In this course, we will closely examine the ways in which sociologists and other scholars have conceptualized and studied sex, gender and sexuality in society, while we try to bring conceptual clarity to these terms and to understand the complex relationships among them. Through this broad survey of the field, our goal is to gain a critical perspective on the ways in which gender and sexuality affect many spheres of social life (at work, in the family, in politics, in the production of scientific knowledge, etc.), drawing real or perceived boundaries of difference that shape the opportunities available to, and the day-to-day experiences and interactions of social subjects. As we will see, we cannot study gender and sexuality without thinking about power.
                                    •   NFDS 2050 A   Introduction to Food Studies  (CRN:5178)  *Online Course* 0 OR 3 Banu , Beatrice   
                                    • In this course, we explore the connections between food, culture, and society, looking at the role of food in the construction of personal and collective identity in terms of body, race and ethnicity, class, gender, nationality, and social movements. We also examine cultural aspects of food politics, paying particular attention to the United States but also considering globalization and international flows of people, goods, ideas, and technologies. The course introduces analytical approaches and methods that are widely used in the growing research field of food studies.
                                      •   PGHT 5660 A   Theorizing Luxury  (CRN:4915) 3 CR Brody , David   W - 12:10 pm to 2:00 pm
                                      • This class assesses luxury design from multiple perspectives. Issues pertaining to consumerism, economics, and labor will be addressed. Specifically, we will look at examples of luxury design and examine these spaces and products in relation to a variety of authors, including, but not limited to, Walter Benjamin, Henri Lebevre, Karl Marx, and Rachel Sherman. Additionally, we will take field trips to sites that our contemporary culture constructs as luxurious. These tours will investigate both the overt presentation of luxury and the labor that creates these deluxe experiences. By the end of the semester, students will be expected to formulate their own critique of luxury in a research project that will utilize both primary sources and the theoretical perspectives we have explored.
                                        Open to: All university graduate degree students.
                                        •   PLFS 4007 A   Fashion and the Body  (CRN:7005) 3 CR Brewster , Maureen   T - 12:10 pm to 2:50 pm
                                        • As fashion studies scholar Joanne Entwistle (2000b: 327) argues, "dress works on the body, imbuing it with social meaning, while the body is a dynamic field that gives life and fullness to dress." This relationship between fashion, the body, and society finds unique expression in celebrity culture, a "dynamic field" that operates as a source for the negotiation of personality and identity in contemporary society. More importantly, images of the celebrity body are a key site for the mediation and consumption of social norms regarding the dressed body. This course will investigate the celebrity body as "a genre of representation and a discursive effectà a commodity [àand] cultural formation" (Turner 2004: 9), in an attempt to uncover how these bodies produce meaning in this particular cultural moment. It will draw upon multiple theoretical and methodological approaches from the fields of media, fashion, and celebrity studies to better understand the fashioned celebrity body as a lens through which themes of structure, agency, representation, identity, and resistance can be explored.
                                          Open to: All university undergraduate degree students. Pre-requisite(s): first-year university writing course and at least two prior history or methods course in art, media, film, or visual culture. One of these courses should be 3000-level.
                                          •   PUPH 4079 A   Picturing Sexuality  (CRN:2054) 3 CR Pitts , George   M - 7:00 pm to 9:40 pm
                                          • This course examines the photographic representation of the female and male body from the 19th century to our present epoch. The course is a passionate, irreverent, analytical, and rigorous study of how the body has been depicted, perceived, and manipulated in the many and diverse periods of photography. Photography examined in the class will include examples from the following genres: anthropology; fine art photography: Victorian, Modernist, and Contemporary; fashion: Surrealist, avant-garde and editorial; amateur: historical erotic snapshots by anonymous photographers; Magazine photography; as well as footage and cinematography from films that overlap historically with the photography the class will study. Many artists will be studied including: Lady Hawarden, Bellocq, Stieglitz, Man Ray, Bunuel and Dali, Hans Bellmer, Bettie Page, Avedon, Pierre Molinier, Jan Saudek, Helmut Newton, Guy Bourdin, Grace Jones, Francesca Woodman, Mapplethorpe, Cindy Sherman, Madonna, Sally Mann, Nobuyoshi Araki, David Lynch, Bettina Rheims, Steven Meisel, Juergen Teller, and Katy Grannan. Students will be expected to contribute original photographic work in conjunction with the specific periods explored in the class. Work will culminate in the development of original project work unique to each student that explores the body or sexuality in a personal or commercial style to be established by each student.
                                            Open to: Bachelors degree in Photography majors, juniors & seniors only; others by permission of Photography program. Pre-requisite(s): PUPH 1010 Freshman Seminar 1 and PUPH 1011 Freshman Seminar 2 or PSAM 1050 Photo 1 and PSAM 1051 Photo 2
                                            •   UGLB 3314 A   Global Gender and Sexuality  (CRN:4148) 4 CR Das , Geeti   TR - 10:00 am to 11:40 am
                                            • This course explores issues of gender and sexuality in comparative and transnational perspective. Incorporating readings from political science, anthropology, sociology, history, theory, and journalism, we pay special attention to the ways in which global flows of labor and discourse determine or limit the ways in which gender roles and sexual hierarchies are produced, reinforced, and challenged. We will explore the tension between universal claims about gender and sexuality and local understandings across regions and cultures, with a particular focus on South and Southeast Asia, and the Americas. Specific topics covered will include the impacts of globalization, migration, and colonialism on gender and sexuality; how gender and norms structure interventions into development and the management of conflict; sex work and questions of autonomy and agency; transgender politics in different cultural contexts; women and domestic or reproductive labor; constructs of masculinity; sexuality, migration and tourism; and the use of scientific discourses to enforce the gender binary.
                                              •   ULEC 2510 A   Introduction to Feminist Thought & Action (Disc. Sec Reqd)  (CRN:7304) 0 CR Snitow , Ann   M - 2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
                                              • Feminism is not a single-voiced, coherent body of doctrine but rather a proliferation of thinking and actions in response to what seems to be the near-universal fact of women's subordination, past and present, in societies which arrange gender relations in a wide variety of ways. Feminism's lack of unity as a movement has been a strength and a weakness, and organized resistance to sexism has come and gone. Right now, in both the United States and internationally, we are living in a time of renewed critical self-consciousness about gender. This course is a sampler of key debates and actions to give a sense of the variety of feminisms that have evolved in the last 40 years. It will track both the growth of feminist movements and their confrontations with backlash. We will discuss readings on reproduction, the gendering of work, theoretical takes on "the death of feminism," the variety of feminisms in different parts of the world, the meaning (and strengths and weaknesses) of the "identity politics" of race and gender, recent discussions of "the body," including discussions of queer theory and trans experience. Visiting speakers and films.
                                                Students must register for both the lecture and discussion section of this course.
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